SLAS E-Newsletter, November 2018

The eNewsletter is compiled and sent out to you by Christy Palmer. If you have an up-coming event or items that you would like included in the next eNewsletter, then please send the details to: christy_palmer@mac.com

PLEASE NOTE: not all 'Call for Papers', are listed in the section 'Call for Papers'. Many are within the conference and seminar notices in the 'Conference and Seminars' section of the eNewsletter. All deadlines have been highlighted or emboldened in red.

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NOTICE BOARD

NEW! SLAS Logo Competition NEW!

All members of SLAS are invited to submit their designs for a new logo for the organisation, primarily for use on the Association’s redesigned website (to be launched in January 2019) and on its Twitter feed. We’re looking for a striking design that will be easily recognisable as representative of the organisation and its remit for years to come, and in exchange we’re offering free attendance at the 2019 SLAS annual conference. Unleash your Latin-Americanist creativity now!

Conditions of entry:

SUBMISSION:

  1. Entries must be submitted by fully paid-up members of SLAS. Entries are welcomed from PILAS members as long as they are also already SLAS members.
  2. Entries must be sent to Karen Siegel (Karen.Siegel@glasgow.ac.uk) no later than 5pm on 10 December 2018.
  3. Entries should be sent as JPEG files in the first instance and should be sent as an email attachment or by file transfer with an accompanying personal email to explain. The winner may be expected to supply the winning design in different file formats on award.
  4. Entries should be sent in as high definition a form as is possible (min 300 dpi).
  5. Designs may be any shape (round, square, rectangular etc.) and any colour, or combination of colours (although do bear in mind that it may sometimes need to be printed in just one block colour).
  6. Designs may incorporate the words ‘Society for Latin American Studies’ or the acronym ‘SLAS’ or not, as the entrant chooses.
  7. If the design is for a logo that does not include the organisation name or acronym, the designer may want to specify how the logo should display in relation to the organisation’s name/acronym where the two are used together. (What font/size/colour would the text be and what positioning would be optimal to work with the logo?)

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Upcoming Deadlines SLAS Funding Oppertunities

These funding opportunities are available to support attendance at the annual SLAS conference.


Ancient Andean genomes show distinct adaptations to farming and altitude
American Society of Human Genetics

Ancient populations in the Andes of Peru adapted to their high-altitude environment and the introduction of agriculture in ways distinct from other global populations that faced similar circumstances, according to findings presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2018 Annual Meeting in San Diego, Calif.

John Lindo, PhD, JD, assistant professor of anthropology at Emory University, and a group of international collaborators headed by Anna Di Rienzo, PhD, at the University of Chicago and Mark Aldenderfer, PhD, at the University of California, Merced, set out to use newly available samples of 7,000-year-old DNA from seven whole genomes to study how ancient people in the Andes adapted to their environment. They compared these genomes with 64 modern-day genomes from both highland Andean populations and lowland populations in Chile, in order to identify the genetic adaptations that took place before the arrival of Europeans in the 1500s.

"Contact with Europeans had a devastating impact on South American populations, such as the introduction of disease, war, and social disruption," explained Dr. Lindo. "By focusing on the period before that, we were able to distinguish environmental adaptations from adaptations that stemmed from historical events."

They found that Andean populations' genomes adapted to the introduction of agriculture and resulting increase in starch consumption differently from other populations. For example, the genomes of European farming populations show an increased number of copies of the gene coding for amylase, an enzyme in saliva that helps break down starch. While Andeans also followed a high-starch diet after they started to farm, their genomes did not have additional copies of the amylase gene, prompting questions about how they may have adapted to this change.

Similarly, Tibetan genomes, which have been studied extensively for their adaptations to high altitude, show many genetic changes related to the hypoxia response -- how the body responds to low levels of oxygen. The Andean genomes did not show such changes, suggesting that this group adapted to high altitude in another way.

The researchers also found that after contact with Europeans, highland Andeans experienced an effective population reduction of 27 percent, far below the estimated 96 percent experienced by lowland populations. Previous archaeological findings showed some uncertainty to this point, and the genetic results suggested that by living in a harsher environment, highland populations may have been somewhat buffered from the reach and resulting effects of European contact. The findings also showed some selection for immune-related genes after the arrival of Europeans, suggesting that Andeans who survived were better able to respond to newly introduced diseases like smallpox.

Building on these findings, Dr. Lindo and his colleagues are currently exploring a new set of ancient DNA samples from the Incan capital Cusco, as well as a nearby lowland group. They are also interested in gene flow and genetic exchange resulting from the wide-ranging trade routes of ancient Andeans.

"Our findings thus far are a great start to an interesting body of research," said Dr. Lindo. "We would like to see future studies involving larger numbers of genomes in order to achieve a better resolution of genetic adaptations throughout history," he said.

Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/10/181017211657.htm

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CONFERENCES & SEMINARS

Mestizaje Reloaded: Racial politics after the Multicultural turn in Mexico
Social Anthropology Seminar
2.016 / 017 (Boardroom), Arthur Lewis Building, Manchester University
5 of November 2018 | 16.15 - 18.00

Speaker: Dr Emiko Saldivar, UC Santa Barbara

In this presentation Dr Emiko Saldivar analyzies how the responses of Mestizos to multicultural and intercultural ideas, practices and policies take shape in Mexico. I explore the complexities of this period by looking at the two most relevant state policies during this period: Intercultural Education, in particular the establishment of around 20 intercultural Universities throughout the country since 2003. Second, the inclusion for the first time, of Afrodescendent people in official statistics and the use of a skin colour pallet. Through the discussion of these examples I will try to map out the different spaces where emerging ideas of identity, culture, race and resistance are being shaped. Each of them is a good exponent of what I identify as the key issues that inform current racial politics in Mexico: the reification of cultural differences and a invested denial of racial categories. All, I argue here, are under the mantle of a possessive investment in mestizaje, to assure that Mestizo privilege stays put.

Second Floor Boardroom 2.016 / 017 Arthur Lewis Building Time 4:15 to 6:00pm (Tea and coffee available outside the room from 4:00pm)

ALL WELCOME!

Contact / Further information: Val Lenferna, 0161 275 4799, val.lenferna@manchester.ac.uk


Open Seminar Series, Michaelmas Term 2018 
Centre of Latin American Studies, University of Cambridge
SG2 Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DT   
Mondays, 17.15, unless otherwise stated

Refreshments served after seminar all welcome

Further events at CLAS: http://www.latin-american.cam.ac.uk/latest-news-and-events


LAC Main Seminar Series: Understanding the Brazilian Elections of 2018 - Round Table
Oxford University, Latin American Centre, 1 Church Walk, Oxford, OX2 6LY
6 November 2018 | 17.00 onwards

Convener(s): Eduardo Posada-Carbo
Speaker(s): Tim Power (LAC, St Antony's College), Fiona Macaulay (Bradford University) & Tereza Campello (former Minister of Social Development of Brazil)

Timothy Power is Professor of Latin American Politics at DPIR and Head of School at the Oxford School of Global and Area Studies (OSGA). His research concerns democracy and political institutions in Latin America, with special attention to Brazil. He has been a visiting professor at the University of Brasília, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, University of São Paulo, University of Campinas, and the Federal University of Minas Gerais. His most recent books are (with Peter Kingstone) Democratic Brazil Divided (Pittsburgh, 2017) and (with Paul Chaisty and Nic Cheeseman) Coalitional Presidentialism in Comparative Perspective (OUP, 2018).

Fiona Macaulay is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Peace Studies and International Development at the University of Bradford, England. Previously she worked at Amnesty International and the University of Oxford's Centre for Brazilian Studies. Her areas of research are gender relations, politics, and the criminal justice system in Brazil and Latin America. She is currently researching the growing trend of police and military officers running for elected office in Brazil.

Tereza Campello served as Minister of Social Development of Brazil from 2011 to 2016 in the cabinet of President Dilma Rousseff.  Trained as an economist at the Federal University of Uberlândia, she was a founding member of the Workers’ Party (PT), and served in PT administrations in the city government of Porto Alegre and the state government of Rio Grande do Sul. At the outset of the Lula government in 2003-2004, she was part of the team that conceived Bolsa Família, the largest conditional cash transfer programme in the world. She is spending academic year 2018-2019 as a visiting scholar at the University of Nottingham.


Inaugural Lecture: Professor Anthony Pereira
Bush House Auditorium, Strand Campus, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS
6 November 2018 | 18:30 - 21:00

Registration from 18.00 for a prompt start at 18.30. Followed by a drinks reception for all.

The Brazilian state in the 21st century is a national developmental state, coordinating the commanding heights of the economy in the service of domestic industry and export promotion. It is also a constitutional state, with a formal commitment to equality of citizenship and the rule of law (as well as a robust set of accountability institutions, evident in the recent anti-corruption investigations). And it is a social democratic state that guarantees a minimum income to the most disadvantaged in society.

In many ways the Brazilian state is a “tropical leviathan”, the most powerful in Latin America, with impressive capacity and sophisticated institutions in many areas (for example, it collects roughly 35 percent of GDP in tax revenue). At the same time, the state does not establish its order or provide security throughout the territory and co-exists with non-state armed actors in urban slums, remote rural areas, and prisons.

This lecture asks what explains this peculiar combination of characteristics, and in particular, the persistence of relatively high levels of violence in Brazil despite rising state capacity in the developmental, constitutional, and social spheres. It reviews the literature on state formation in search of answers to this question and suggests that the relationships between police forces in the states and those at the national centre are a key element in understanding the issue.

About Anthony Pereira

Anthony Pereira is Professor of Brazilian Studies and Director of the King’s Brazil Institute, within the School of Global Affairs, Faculty of Social Science & Public Policy.

Antony Pereira’s current work concerns citizenship, human rights, public security, and state coercion in Brazil. This includes a study of the performance of a relatively new human rights institution, the police ombudsman, in two different states in Brazil, as well as an analysis of some recent efforts to reform the police.

Contact: ssppcomms@kcl.ac.uk, 020 7848 7170

To attend you must register.


Marvelous Monsters: The Rhinoceros and the Megatherium
Room 349, Third Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
7 November 2018 | 18.00 - 20.00

Professor Juan Pimentel, Spanish National Research Council

In this lecture, Professor Pimentel will share insights from the research that went into his prize-winning book on the place of exotic animals in early modern European natural history, recently published by Harvard University Press.  

“[A] fascinating book… Pimentel rather brilliantly describes his book as a ‘historical essay with a tentative and slightly provocative character’ (for which praise must be shared with Peter Mason, for his excellent translation). And if that isn’t a wonderfully tempting hook for the reader, then what is? The Rhinoceros and the Megatherium is part detective story reconstructing the scientific process, and part historical study of how people reacted to the hitherto unknown and unusual. The parallels drawn by Pimentel are beautifully constructed and drip from the page like honey: a section describing the sea voyages of the fossils mirroring the political and intellectual shifts of the periods is especially effective… He has adeptly and eloquently brought back to life not only these two much-marvelled-at beasts but the minds of the people who sought to explain them and the worlds in which they lived.”
-- Simon Underdown, Times Higher Education 

This lecture will be followed by a reception in honour of the author. The event is free, but spaces are limited so please reserve your spot by registering below. To book your place at this event, please click here.


Fake News in Latin America: Globalising the History of the First World War
LAC History Seminar Series
Oxford University, Latin American Centre, 1 Church Walk, Oxford, OX2 6LY
8 November 2018 | 17.00 onwards

Convener: Eduardo Posada-Carbo
Speaker: Stefan Rinke (Freie Universität Berlin)

Stefan Rinke is Professor of Latin American History at the Institute of Latin American Studies at Freie Universität Berlin. He was an Einstein Research Fellow 2013-2015, has received the Premio Alzate of the Mexican Academy of Sciences and of CONACYT, and a honorary doctorate from Universidad Nacional de San Martín in Buenos Aires for his work in 2017. He is speaker of the German-Mexican Graduate School “Between Spaces” – a cooperative doctoral program with El Colegio de México, UNAM and CIESAS. Amongst his most recent publications: Latin America and the First World War (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2017) and América Latina y Estados Unidos: Una historia entre espacios desde la época colonial hasta hoy (Madrid/México: Marcial Pons/El Colegio de México, 2015). In total he has published 12 monographs - most of which have been translated into several different languages - 32 co-edited volumes, and more than 160 articles in academic journals around the world. Rinke is member of the board of the journals Geschichte und Gesellschaft and Iberoamericana, and co-editor of the Encyclopedia of Early Modern History (Brill). His research interests focus on re-thinking Latin American history from a global perspective.


UCL-Cuba research collaboration: progress and possibilities
Room 103, UCL Institute of the Americas, 51 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PN
8 November 2018 | 17.30 - 19.30

Organiser: Dr Emily Morris (Institute of the Americas), emily.morris@ucl.ac.uk, 020 7679 2000

The UCL-Cuba Research Network (UCL-CRN) brings together researchers from across the university who have experience or interest in developing research collaboration with Cuban partners. It welcomes members from all disciplines, and aims is to stimulate the growth of fruitful collaboration by sharing information and working together to explore the potential for building on Cuba’s considerable research capacities.

Speakers

Dr Emily Morris, co-ordinator of the UCL-CRN, will provide a brief overview of recent developments in Cuba, and their significance for the potential for academic collaboration. Some UCL members of the network who are working on current projects will then introduce themselves and describe the work they are doing, including where the funding comes from, who their partners are, the progress made and challenges faced.

Leandro Benitez and David Lopez, visiting young academics from the University of Havana’s Innovation unit, will introduce themselves and describe their own work and interests.

Although admittance to this event is free, places are limited and booking is required to avoid disappointment.


UK Business in Latin America: Round Table, jointly organised with Canning House
LAC Main Seminar Series
13 November 2018 | 17.00 onwards
Oxford University, Latin American Centre, 1 Church Walk, Oxford, OX2 6LY

Convener(s): Eduardo Posada-Carbo
Speaker(s): Antonio Celia (former CEO Promigás, Colombia), Beatriz Araujo, Baker McKenzie and Thomas Mills (Lancaster University)

Chaired by Cristina Cortes, Canning House

Antonio Celia former CEO of Promigas, one of the oldest private companies in the natural gas industry of Latin America, since 1992, is currently a Visiting Professor in Practice at the London School of Economics. Mr. Celia is Chairman of the Board of Directors of Grupo Nutresa and Naturgas – Natural Gas Association–an entity that represents the natural gas industry in Colombia; President of the Private Competitiveness Council; and member of the board of Directors of Colombian think-tank Fedesarrollo. He is founding partner and member of the Board of Directors of Empresarios para la Educación, an association of businessmen in support of education, where he played an important role as a Chairman during seven years. He also serves as a Chairman of the Board of the Pies Descalzos Foundation, sponsored by Shakira, the well-known Colombian singer and composer; member of the Board of Directors of the Ideas for Peace Foundation, and Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors of Universidad del Norte. Mr. Celia has been a promoter of several cultural initiatives and serves as Chairman of Fundación la Cueva, which honours the memory of the “Group of Barranquilla” once led by the Noble laureate Gabriel Garcia Márquez. For his performance as a business and social leader, he has received several awards and recognitions from several Colombian newspapers and organizations, including Portafolio (the leading business daily), Semana (the country’s leading weekly) and the Liderazgo y Democracia Foundation. Earlier this year he was awarded the Cruz de Boyacá, the highest distinction conferred by the government of Colombia. Mr. Celia completed a BSc in Engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute of Massachusetts and executive education courses from the Universidad de los Andes, MIT, the Wharton School of Business, and LSE.

Beatriz Araujo is a corporate partner in Baker McKenzie’s London office, Beatriz has been an active member of the Canning House Board since June 2014 and a valued supporter of Canning House for many years before then. She takes over from Dr Peter Collecott CMG, who has been Chairman since April 2016 and stepped down at the end of 2017 after six years of distinguished service as a Trustee. Beatriz is a member of the Baker McKenzie’s Corporate Practice Group, as well as its Financial Institutions, Industrials, EMI and Healthcare groups. Since serving on the Firm’s Global Executive Committee (2009-2013), Beatriz is spearheading Baker McKenzie’s Corporate Governance Group. Beatriz’ practice focuses on advising boards and multinational groups on company law, in particular director duties, and corporate governance matters and best practice approaches to embed governance and values in organisations with a view to companies building trust with all stakeholders and third parties, including regulators. She also advises clients in Spain, Portugal and Latin America investing into the UK and Europe.

Thomas Mills is a lecturer in the Department of History at Lancaster University. His research focuses primarily on British and American foreign policy towards Latin America during the twentieth century. His first book, Post-war Planning on the Periphery, explored Anglo-American relations in South America during the Second World War in the broader context of the post-war economic diplomacy undertaken by the wartime allies. He has previously published articles in Diplomacy and Statecraft and the Journal of Transatlantic Studies. His current research includes a collaborative project exploring Anglo-American relations in Latin America throughout the twentieth century, and a project exploring Britain's contemporary role in Latin America. He is a regular commentator on historical and contemporary international affairs, appearing on media outlets including Sky News, BBC Radio Five Live, and France 24. He is also Vice-Chair of the Transatlantic Studies Association.

Cristina Cortes is an Oxford and LSE politics and economics graduate. Having worked in government, banking and energy across a variety of commercial, business development and government relations roles in London, Houston, Venezuela, Colombia, Argentina and Brazil, in 2015 she joined Canning House, the UK’s leading forum for Latin America and Iberia. She took over as CEO earlier this year.


Opportunities and Gender
SCI Belgrave Square, 14/15 Belgrave Square, SW1X 8PS
14 November 2018 | 18.00 - 20.00

Canning House’s Opportunities Series will examine, through various lenses, the opportunities and obstacles faced by disadvantaged groups in Latin America.

The first event, Opportunities and Gender, considers the challenges to achieving gender equality.

Canning House presents a panel of speakers to address these questions, including Jess Phillips, MP for Birmingham Yardley, whose book Everywoman, One Woman’s Truth About Speaking the Truth was shortlisted for the Parliamentary Book Awards 2017; Maxine Molyneux, Professor of Sociology at UCL, who has written extensively on gender and development in Latin America and acted as a senior adviser to UNIFEM and UN Women; and Rosy Cave, Head of the Gender Equality Unit at the Foreign & Commonwealth Office; and Lucila Granada, Director of the LAWRS (Latin American Women’s Rights Service).

To attend this event, you must book your place.


Yma Sumac and Moisés Vivanco: Between Myth and History
Woburn Suite, G22/26, Ground Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
14 November 2018 | 17.30 - 19.30

Cultural icons Yma Sumac and Moisé Vivanco strategically deployed a mythic image of Peru to satisfy the insatiable foreign demand for the exotic, on the rise in the USA and Europe during the post-war period. At the same time, they used the vehicle of the exotic to forward their own agendas as Peruvian subjects on the world scene. Sumac and Vivanco operated within a context that included 1) the development of the record industry in Latin America, with Buenos Aires its main hub; 2) the massification of musical shows; 3) the rise of a global pop culture that avidly consumed nativism (indigenismo) and other forms of exoticism. I critique the canonical, indigenista view of Sumac and Vivanco as fakes produced by Hollywood handlers. Such views were promoted by Nicolás Limansky in his Yma Sumac: The Art behind the Legend, and by anthropologist and novelist José María Arguedas, who denounced the couple’s inauthenticity. What these views failed to consider was not only the global agency of Sumac and Vivanco but also the cultural construction and marketing of Peru by a group of Peruvian intellectuals active during the Leguía period (1919-1930).

To book your place at this event, please click here.


'Violence on Screen: Desecrated Bodies and Popular Imaginings of Mexico'
A202, Samuel Alexander Building, Manchester University
14 November 2018 | 17.00 onwards

Speaker: Niamh Thornton, Reader in Latin American Studies, University of Liverpool.

Centre for Latin American and Caribbean Studies research seminar.

To attend or for further information about this event, please contact James Scorer, james.scorer@manchester.ac.uk


Transnational Law Institute & the Brazil Institute present the 'Justa' Project: the politics of the Brazilian Judicial System
King's College London, Room K2.40, King's Building, Strand Campus, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS
14 November 2018 | 16:00 - 18:00

This event is co-organised by the Transnational Law Institute, the Brazil Institute and the department of War Studies at King's College London.

Speaker: Luciana Zaffalon, Brazilian human rights activist

The Brazilian Judicial System is one of the most expensive in the world. However, it doesn't mean that it works properly. 'Justa' is a project created to understand how the judicial system is managed in Brazil, and how dangerous this system can be if it is pervaded by the interdependent and unbalanced relation among the judiciary, the legislature, and the executive. 'Justa' aims to examine whether the checks and balances mechanisms are working as they should and to provide empirical evidence that shows whether the separation of powers may be or not compromised by the relationship between the three branches. The project's creator, Luciana Zaffalon, arrives in London to share 'Justa's' first outcomes regarding the Brazilian criminal justice. The first findings come from big data collected from the prosecution services and offices as well as from state assemblies and governments. The main goal is examining how the relationship between the three branches can impact on social life and on the democratic organizations. This study focuses on budget, legislative and governmental intersections to analyse in-depth how the judicial system's puzzle works.

This event is free of charge.

To attend you must register.


The Caribbean Frontier: Learning from the ‘small’ islands - St. Vincent and the Grenadines
Lecture Room 103, UCL Institute of the Americas, 51 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PN
14 November 2018 | 17.30 - 19.00

A neglected feature of societies in the Caribbean is their ‘frontier’ style. They are societies caught in the balance between imposed ‘civilizing’ forces and an untamed ‘wild’ that is forever encroaching. Both elements are also in constant flux. Frontier traits are to be found as much in the way that these societies are organized and run, as they are to be found in the traits or styles of Caribbean Individuals. My paper will first discuss problems and limitations at the theoretical and practical levels with existing ways of reading the Caribbean. I will go on to offer a ‘frontier analysis’ that provides an alternative approach to understanding the region.

Philip Nanton is an Honorary Research Associate at University of Birmingham, UK. He is a Barbados based Caribbean writer who lectures occasionally at University of the West Indies, Cave Hill, Barbados. His recent publications include Island Voices from St. Christopher and the Barracudas (2014), Canouan Suite and Other Pieces (2016) both from Papillote Press and Frontiers of the Caribbean (2017) Manchester University Press.

Attendance to this event is free of charge but registration is required.


LAC History Seminar Series: The Rise and Fall of the Mexican Developmental State in the Twentieth Century
Oxford University, Latin American Centre, 1 Church Walk, Oxford, OX2 6LY
15 November 2018 | 17.00 onwards

Convener: Eduardo Posada-Carbo
Speaker: Alan Knight (Latin American Centre, Oxford)

Alan Knight, former Professor of Latin American History at Oxford University, is an Emeritus Fellow of the Latin American Centre.  His chief interest is twentieth-century Latin American history, with a focus on Mexico, agrarian society, state-building and revolutions. He is the author of The Mexican Revolution (2 vols, Cambridge, 1986) US-Mexican Relations, 1910-40 (San Diego, 1987); of the chapter on Mexico, 1930-1946, in The Cambridge History of Latin America (Vol. VII, 1990); and of two volumes of a three volume general history of Mexico, Mexico: From the Beginning to the Conquest, and Mexico: The Colonial Era (Cambridge, 2002). He has written several articles dealing with aspects of twentieth-century Mexico (state-building, popular movements, education and culture, current politics) and co-edited The Mexican Petroleum Industry in the 20th Century (1992).  He previously taught at the University of Essex and the University of Texas at Austin, where he held the C.B. Smith Chair, and in 1986 was a visiting fellow at the Center for US-Mexican Studies at the University of California, San Diego.  His work has been recognized with several awards, including the Order of the Aztec Eagle from the Mexican government.  In 1986 he was awarded the Albert Beveridge Prize and in 1987 the Bolton Prize from the Conference on Latin American History for his two-volume work on the Mexican Revolution.


Assessing the potential of civil organizations within regions affected by organized crime
Room 234, Second Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
15 November 2018 | 17.30 - 19.30

This session’s presentations are part of the University of Aberdeen and El Colegio de Michoacán ESRC-funded project ‘Assesing the Potential for Civil Organisations within Regions Affected by Criminal Violence to Hold State Institutions to the Goals of Human Rights-Based Development’.

“Un hombre es para lo que se ocupa”: Civilian Responses to the Security Crisis in Mexico
Dr Irene Álvarez
, University of Aberdeen, COLMICH and CIDE

I am interested in exploring the effects of criminal violence, performed by illicit private companies and agents of the State, in the context of the War on Drugs, among rural populations of Western Mexico. The activities of organized crime—this understood as a set of relations between private and public actors—against citizens impacted the social organisation of sexuality and family, threatening moral values linked to a hegemonic masculinity. Therefore, I argue that in some cases, the civilian response to criminal violence can be understood as an attempt to restore a patriarchal moral order.

The Mexican Avocado Agribusiness and the Fragmentation of Sovereignty: A Case Study in Michoacán
Dr Denisse Román Burgos
, University of Aberdeen, COLMICH and CIDE

On November 16th, a group of agribusiness men from the municipality of Tancítaro, Michoacán (in southwestern Mexico), started an armed uprising with the help of the vigilante groups from that same state. The aim of the uprising was to expel the Templar Knights Cartel, a local drug cartel that had managed to seize control of the production and circulation of avocado. After the events, vigilante groups were established in Tancítaro. These groups set up network of checkpoints around the municipal borders and at the entrance of each of its towns. How can the overlapping of a growing agribusiness with the presence of local vigilante groups be characterized? What does this overlapping mean in terms of sovereignty? Drawing on eight months of ethnographic fieldwork, the aim of this paper is to analyze the formation of what I call the “agro-industrial enclave” and its implications for state sovereignty.

All are welcome. Attendance is free.

For more information about the seminar and future sessions, you can visit our blog. You can also Follow us on Facebook and Twitter to receive seminar updates.

To attend, please book now.


Protests, Images and Visibility during the 2013 Uprising in Brazil
King's Brazil Institute Seminar Series
King's College London, K-1.56, Strand Campus, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS
20 November 2018 | 18:00 - 21:00

César Jiménez-Martínez is an ESRC fellow at Loughborough University. He holds a PhD in Media and Communications from the London School of Economics and Political Science. His doctoral thesis examined how various actors employed the media during the June 2013 protests in Brazil to project several versions of national identity. His work has been published in journals such as the International Journal of Communication, Geopolitics and Place Branding and Public Diplomacy. He is currently preparing a monograph about the protests in Brazil for Palgrave MacMillan.

Contact: anna.grimaldi@kcl.ac.uk


How Bolivia’s Coca Growers Reinvented Democracy
Room 234, Second Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
21 November 2018 | 17.30 - 19.30

Dr Thomas Grisaffi, University of Reading

At the turn of the twenty-first century, social movements across the globe are reinventing democracy. However, few if any have been as long-lasting or powerful as the Movement Towards Socialism (MAS) in Bolivia. This talk traces the political ascent of MAS from a union of coca growers criminalized under US led drug war policies, to Bolivia’s dominant political party. This talk reveals the inside story that union leaders, activists and academics have so far refused to tell: How coca growers are implicated in the cocaine trade through the production and selling of coca leaf and the processing of cocaine paste. The aim here is not to expose the illegal activities of the growers but rather to theorize the contradictions in Bolivia’s claim to be an indigenous and grassroots democracy.

To book your place at this event, please click here.


The structure and significance of British Caribbean slave-ownership 1763-1833
Lecture Room 103, UCL Institute of the Americas, 51 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PN
21 November 2018 | 17.30 - 19.00

Organiser: Dr Kate Quinn (UCL Institute of the Americas), katherine.quinn@ucl.ac.uk, 020 7679 2000

This paper presents some of the new work underway in the Legacies of British Slave-ownership project, discussing preliminary findings from the mapping of ownership of estates and of the enslaved people attached to them for the period between the expansion of the British slave-empire in 1763 and Emancipation in the 1830s, and setting out some potential applications of the new material for historians of both Britain and the Caribbean in this period.

About the Speaker

Dr Nick Draper, Director at UCL Centre for the Study of the Legacies of British Slave-ownership

Dr Nick Draper is the Director of the new UCL Centre for the Study of the Legacies of British Slave-ownership. Between 2013 and 2015, he was co-director of the Structure and significance of British Caribbean slave-ownership 1763-1833 project at UCL, and was a founder-member of its precursor, the Legacies of British Slave-ownership project, which ran at UCL from 2009-2012. His book Legacies of British Slave-ownership: Colonial Slavery and the Formation of Victorian Britain (with C. Hall, K. McClelland, K. Donington and R. Lang) was published last year by Cambridge University Press. His The Price of Emancipation: slave-ownership, compensation and British society at the end of slavery (CUP, 2010) was awarded the Royal Historical Society’s Whitfield Prize and shortlisted for the Frederick Douglass prize. He is a member of the Finance Committee, and a Fellow, of the Royal Historical Society. Prior to his current research, he worked in the City of London for 25 years.

While attendance at this event is free, places are limited and booking is required to avoid disappointment.


Launch of the Centre for the Comparative Study of Portugal, Spain and the Americas (CEPSAM)
Swansea University, Research Institute for Arts and Humanities
Taliesin Create, Singleton Campus, Swansea
23 November 2018 | 14.15 onwards

This event will include a talk titled 'Rethinking the Intergenerational Transmission of Memory: Surrogation in Works by Pedro Almodóvar and Inês Pedrosa', to be given by Professor Alison Ribeiro de Menezes (University of Warwick).

Alison Riberio de Menezes’s most recent monograph is Embodying Memory in Contemporary Spain (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014). As PI of the AHRC-funded project, 'Chilean Exiles and World University Service', she collaborates with the Museum of Memory and Human Rights, Santiago, on preserving and analysing oral testimonies of Chilean exiles in the UK.

In Spain and Portugal, we have seen a paradigm shift from the novel, which privileged a discursive deconstruction of ideologies of nation and national identity, to narratives that explore intimate stories and affective resonances. The past remains a strong focus in contemporary Luso-Hispanic fiction, but whereas it was previously viewed in terms of conflictive narrative engagements with history, it is now more frequently approached through emotive and affective narratives of memory. This paper will explore this shift in terms of the role of gendered perspectives in opening up discussions about the legacies of the past, and particularly in challenging heteronormative conceptions of cultural transmission when applied to memory concerns.

All are welcome. Admission is free.

Coordinator: Dr L.H. Davies


New Private Financing for Development: Latin America in comparative perspective
Room G4, Ground Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
23 November 2018 | 10.00 - 18.00

To read the full programme, with complete descriptions of panels and papers, please download this PDF. This event is kindly supported by the British Academy / Leverhulme Small Research Grant Scheme.

To book your place at this event, please click here.


Latin American Music Seminar
Room 349, Third Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
24 November 2018 | 10.00 - 17.00

The Latin American Music Seminar is a British forum for Latin American music research that meets twice yearly. Please contact Henry Stobart if you would like to be included on the mailing list, or if you wish to offer a presentation or to perform at a future seminar. 

In collaboration with the Institute of Musical Research

We ask for a contribution of £8.00 towards coffee, tea and lunch (unless presenting a paper or performing).

To book your place at this event, please use this link.


Envisioning Modern Brazil through Images: Photography, Cinema and Literature
St John’s College, Old Divinity School, Lightfoot Room, University of Cambridge
28 November 2018

10.15 Welcoming Remarks
Frank Salmon, President St John’s College, University of Cambridge
T.B.C., His Excellency the Ambassador of Brazil to the United Kingdom
11.15 Keynote: How (and how not) to read images
Peter Burke, Fellow, Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge, FBA
Chair: Ana Maria Mauad, Celso Furtado Visiting Fellow St John’s College, University of Cambridge & Federal Fluminense University, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro
12.30 Lunch (not provided)
14.00 Roundtable
In and out of focus: visualizing modern Brazil
Luciana Martins, Birkbeck, University of London
The Double Elegy of Dom Casmurro
Ana Claudia Suriani, University College London
The photographer, the singer and the Brazilian Good Neighbour images
Ana Maria Mauad, Celso Furtado Visiting Fellow, St John’s College, University of Cambridge & Federal Fluminense University, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro
Chair: Viviane Carvalho da Annunciação (St. John’s College, University of Cambridge)
16.00 Refreshments
16.30 Discussant: Maria Lúcia Pallares-Burke (Research Associate, Centre of Latin American Studies, University of Cambridge)
17.30 Wine Reception
18.30 END

Kindly supported by: St John’s College and the Centre of Latin American Studies, University of Cambridge
CAPES, Ministry of Education, Brazil

(Free event register at jac46@cam.ac.uk).


Trafficking in Trust: armoured Cars in Guatemala City
Vera Anstey Rm, Old Building, LSE
28 November 2018 | 18.30 - 20.00

Dozens of boutique auto-shops in Guatemala City fortify cars against varying levels of threat, from 9 mm pistols to military grade assault rifles. Mechanics line windows, wheels, and even skylights with bulletproof materials, promising an almost impenetrable vehicle amid a decidedly violent Central American city. In response to this growing confidence not just in Kevlar but also the intimacy of artisanal labour, this talk engages the culture of armoured cars to open an ethnographic window into the imbrication of traffic and trust. As extended fieldwork evidences, mobile fortification reorients social relationships towards the imperative to trust—auto-shop owners, mechanics, and even the cars themselves—while also expanding the footprint of those who supposedly occupy the wrong side of a security wall.

This event is part of a three-year international research collaboration on Traffic in the Americas, which will explore the varied relationships between two different understandings of the word traffic. The first is vehicles moving on a road and the second is the trading in something illegal. The aim is to engage themes such as security, mobility, and infrastructure in the Americas from a novel perspective. The participating units include the Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies at the University of Toronto, the Latin American and Caribbean Centre at the LSE, the Institute on Equality and Democracy at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Centro Interdisciplinario de Estudios sobre Desarrollo at the Universidad de los Andes(Bogotá, Colombia).

Professor Suzanne Hall 

Suzanne Hall is an urban ethnographer and has practised as an architect in South Africa. She is Co-director of the Cities Programme and Associate Professor in Sociology at the LSE. Suzi’s research and teaching interests explore intersections of global migration and urban marginalisation in the context of inequality, discrimination and resistance. Her research focuses on the street life of brutal borders, migrant economies and urban multi-culture.

Professor Kevin Lewis O’Neill 

A cultural and social anthropologist, Kevin Lewis O’Neill is Professor in the Department for the Study of Religion and Director of the Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies at the University of Toronto. He is the author of City of God (California 2010), Secure the Soul (California 2015), and Hunted (Chicago May 2019).

Professor Austin Zeiderman 

Austin Zeiderman is Associate Professor in the Department of Geography and Environment at the London School of Economics. He is an interdisciplinary scholar who specializes in the cultural and political dimensions of urbanization, development, and the environment in Latin America and the Caribbean, with a specific focus on Colombia. Austin holds a PhD in Anthropology from Stanford University as well as a Master of Environmental Science degree from Yale University and a bachelor’s degree in Economics from Colgate University.

Attendance

To attend, please use this link.


Transgenerational memories in artworks by children and grandchildren of victims of Pinochet’s dictatorship.’
Connecting Memories Keynote Lecture 2018
Room G.01, 50 George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9LY
30 November 2018 | 17.30 onwards

We are delighted to announce that the next Connecting Memories keynote lecture which will be delivered by Dr Alicia Salomone (University of Chile) entitled, ‘Transgenerational memories in artworks by children and grandchildren of victims of Pinochet’s dictatorship.’ Dr Salomone's keynote lecture will be followed by a Q&A and a wine reception.

We are grateful to the University of Edinburgh's Department of European Literatures and Cultures (DELC) and Centre for Contemporary Latin American Studies (CCLAS) for their support with this event. 

Please register your attandance of this event through Eventbrite so we are able to sort out catering arrangements.


Indigenous Autonomy, Leadership and Local Political Conflict in Highland Bolivia
Room 246, Second Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
29 November 2018 | 17.30 - 19.30

Matthew Doyle, University of Sussex

Among the Quechua-speaking highland indigenous communities of Bolivar province in the Cochabamba department of Bolivia there exist multiple overlapping forms of local political authority, including the municipal government, peasant union and the traditional authorities who claim to pre-date the Spanish conquest. Ironically, the national project of the governing 'Movement Towards Socialism' (MAS) party to re-found the Bolivian state so as to include the country's ‘indigenous majority’ has coincided with an intensification of conflict between them.

This talk will examine how legal and institutional changes that purport to further the decolonisation of Bolivian society through recognising indigenous forms of governance have served to further intra-community conflict among the inhabitants of this particular indigenous community. Specifically, one of the centrepieces of the incipient ‘plurinational state’ is the provision for indigenous peasant communities to become quasi-independent entities with their own forms of internal administration based on traditional customs. Yet the ambiguities of the conversion process and the ambivalence of the national government has meant that this has become the basis for conflict. This brings into sharp relief not only the differences between these forms of local authority but some of the central tensions within the MAS project of political reform.

All are welcome. Attendance is free.

For more information about the seminar and future sessions, you can visit our blog. You can also Follow us on Facebook and Twitter to receive seminar updates.

BOOK NOW


South American Archaeology Seminar
UCL, Institute of Archaeology, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY
1 December 2018 | 09.40 - 17.00

Organised by UCL Institute of Archaeology

09.40 Coffee/ Registration
10.10 In search of the organization of daily practices and spaces. The case of El Churcal, NW Argentina, during the Late Intermediate Period
Santiago Barbich (CONICET – National University of La Plata)
10.50 Who is controlling what? Assessing the role of local populations in the administration and managing of resources, routes, and spaces during the Inca period in the Arica area of Northern Chile.
Miguel Fuentes (UCL Institute of Archaeology)
11.30 Coffee
12.00 The place of ‘conopa’: non-Inca worldviews in Inca ideologies of power.
Viviana Siveroni (UCL, Institute of Archaeology)
12.40 The Cusco Valley Inca Road Network.
Kevin Floerke (Independent scholar) and Stephen Berquist (University of Toronto)
13.20 Lunch
14.10 Dates as data revisited: A statistical examination of the Peruvian Preceramic radiocarbon record.
Philip Riris (UCL, Institute of Archaeology)
14.50 The rise of monumentality at the Mouth of the Amazon River.
João Saldanha (?)
15.30 Tea
16.00 Evaluating Archaeology as a Resource for Development in Peru: why, how?
Agathe Dupeyron (University of East Anglia, School of International Development)
16.40 Displays of identity: A community-engaged approach to studying identity through participatory research.
Shaina Molano (University of California, Merced) and Kimberly Munro (Louisiana State University)

You are asked to make a contribution of £10.00 towards the cost of coffee, tea & lunch. Please book at: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/event-ticketing/booking/?ev=18068-1

If you would like to give a talk at a future seminar or for further information please contact Bill Sillar, b.sillar@ucl.ac.uk.


A relational South: Thinking cultural dynamics between China and Brazil
King's College London, King’s Building, Strand Campus, London WC2R 2LS
4 December 2018 | 18:00 - 21:00

Carla de Utra Mendes is an affiliate of the Lau China Institute, King’s College London, UK. She is also a member of the British Association for Chinese Studies (BACS), the Chinese Collections Group, and a writing fellow of the Urban Photographers Association (UPA). She holds a PhD in Global Studies (University of Saint Joseph, Macao S.A.R., China), as former fellow of the Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT) of Portugal. Graduate in Art History, and since her Masters degree, both from the Faculty of Human and Social Sciences of Universidade NOVA Lisbon, Portugal, she has been focusing on East Asia, particularly on Chinese Studies. She continues to develop research on contemporary China with interests that range from politics to art and cultural analysis. Her most recent publications were on China Daily, co-authoring with Professor Kerry Brown ‘China’s vision of common destiny of a shared future’ (2018) and, individually ‘Xi’s speech lays out positive vision’ (2018). In the field of contemporary art and museums, she has fulfilled several roles from museum and independent curator, museum educator and independent art critic, having collaborated with institutions such as Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation (Lisbon, Portugal), amongst many others.

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EVENTS

Fighting for indigenous and land rights in Peru, Hugo Blanco (Peru)
Community Centre, 62 Marchmont Street, WC1N 1AB
6 November 2018 | 19.00 - 21.00

The discussion introduced by Hugo Blanco, author of We the Indians published by Resistance Books and Merlin Press 
and Terry Conway, editor at Resistance Books.

Hugo Blanco has been described as the ‘Fidel Castro of the Andes’, like Fidel and Che. Hugo Blanco was a charismatic revolutionary during the 1960s. In 2018, still very active at the age of 83, he follows the path of the Mexican Zapatista’s substituting, to a large extent, an anarchist indigenous politics for his previous Leninism. For many years he has been centrally concerned with the ecological crisis and how we fight it.

To attend please register.


Roundtable: The far right rises in Brazil: what explains and what to
expect from Bolsonaro’s electoral victory
Fitzpatrick Hall, Queen’s College, Cambridge, CB3 9ET
8 November 2018 | 17.00 - 19.00

Speakers:

Maite Conde (University of Cambridge)
Malu Gatto (University of Zurich)
Nadya Araujo Guimarães (University of São Paulo)
Alfredo Saad-Filho (SOAS, University of London)
Graham Denyer Willis (University of Cambridge)
Pedro Mendes Loureiro (University of Cambridge)

On 28 October, Brazil became the latest country to elect a far-right head of state, amplifying Latin America’s drift from the left and following the global rise of the far right. The election took place amidst massive economic and political crisis, rising crime rates, and growing inequality and poverty. In the middle of this turmoil, president-elect Jair Bolsonaro led a campaign built openly upon misogynistic, racist, homophobic and anti-democratic positions, cruising to win 55% of valid votes, against 45% of the Workers’ Party (PT) candidate Fernando Haddad. Bolsonaro’s platform drew on widespread disillusionment with the PT, promising to reduce crime rates via shoot-to-kill policies and to eliminate corruption, combined with affirmations of broad economic neoliberalisation under the aegis of Chicago-trained economist Paulo Guedes.

This panel will explore some explanations for Bolsonaro’s electoral victory, the prospects of his government, and some of its national, regional and international implications. Are social, political and economic rights doomed to democratic collapse, or are Brazil’s institutions and popular organisations strong enough to check the president-elect’s authoritarian promises? What has enabled the far right to win in Brazil, and how is this related to previous PT governments and the ongoing national economic and political crisis? What are the likely spaces for resistance, and what does his victory imply for Latin America and the world? The panel includes contributions from six speakers with varied backgrounds, to be followed by discussion. No registration required.

Organisers: Gabriela Ramos, Graham Denyer Willis, Maite Conde, Pedro Mendes Loureiro.


Shaping Migration between Europe and Latin America: New Perspectives and Challenges
Room G12, Ground Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
16 November 2018 | 16.00 - 18.00

Chair: Prof. Mark Thurner, ILAS

Panel and Book Launch

Dr. Ana Margheritis, University of Southampton and ILAS
Dr. Marcia Vera-Espinoza, Queen Mary University of London
Dr David Doyle, University of Oxford (Discussant)

Followed by a wine reception.

To book your place at this event, please click here.


Historias de El Salvador / Stories from El Salvador
Seven Sisters Indoor Market, 231-243 High Rd, London, N15 5BT
17 November 2018 | 12.00 - 14.00

Historias de El Salvador

El Salvador hizo historia cuando en 2017 se convirtió en el primer país del mundo en prohibir la minería metálica. Anímate a participar en una tarde de narración de los acontecimientos que llevaron a la prohibición en español y de degustación de comida típica salvadoreña. Te contaremos la historia con grabaciones de las voces de personas directamente involucradas en ese proceso. La actividad tendrá lugar en el Seven Sisters Indoor Market y servirá asimismo para dar a conocer y generar conciencia sobre las propias luchas de lo que se conoce como el UK Latin Village por proteger el legado cultural de América Latina en esa zona de Londres.

ILAS está encantada de colaborar en esta actividad con Save Latin Village.

Esta actividad es parte del Being Human 2018, el único festival de las humanidades en el Reino Unido. Being Human es un foro nacional que promueve la participación del público en la investigación en las humanidades. Es liderado por el School of Advanced Study, de la University of London, en colaboración con el Arts and Humanities Research Council y la British Academy. 

La participación en el evento es gratuita pero la capacidad limitada, por lo que es necesario reservar un lugar registrándose en el enlace disponible abajo (“Book Now”).

Stories from El Salvador

El Salvador made history in 2017 by becoming the first country in the world to ban metal mining. Join us for an afternoon of Spanish-language storytelling and Salvadoran food tasting as you learn more about the origins and development of this decade-long struggle. You’ll hear narrated and recorded testimonies from individuals directly affected by the process. Hosted by the Seven Sisters indoor market, the event will also raise awareness of the UK Latin Village’s own struggles to preserve the area’s Latin American cultural heritage.

ILAS is delighted to be working in partnership with Save Latin Village on this event.

This event is part of Being Human 2018, the UK’s only national festival of the humanities. Led by the School of Advanced Study, University of London, in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the British Academy, Being Human is a national forum for public engagement with humanities research.

The event is free, but spaces are limited so please reserve your spot by registering.

PLEASE NOTE THIS EVENT WILL BE IN SPANISH ONLY


Filming Transition: Documentary Lenses on Colombia’s Peace Process
Room 103, Institute of the Americas, 51 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PQ
27 November 2018 | 17.30 - 20.00

Organiser: Dr Katherine Saunders-Hastings (Institute of the Americas), k.saunders-hastings@ucl.ac.uk, 020 7679 2000

This event brings together two documentary films. Each speaks to essential facets and experiences of the search for substantive and sustainable peace in Colombia.

This event is free, but you must book your place.


Book launch: Oxford Handbook of the Brazilian Economy with editor Edward Amann
Bush House, Lecture Theatre 1, Strand Campus, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS
3 December 2018 | 17:00 - 19:00

Brazil is a globally vital but troubled economy. This volume offers comprehensive insight into Brazil's economic development, focusing on its most salient characteristics and analyzing its structural features across various dimensions. This innovative Oxford Handbook provides an understanding of the economy's evolution over time and highlights the implications of the past trajectory and decisions for current challenges and opportunities. The opening section covers the country's economic history, beginning with the colonial economy, through import-substitution, to the era of neoliberalism. Second, it analyses Brazil's broader place in the global economy, and considers the ways in which this role has changed, and is likely to change, over coming years. Particular attention is given to the productive sectors of Brazil's economy, for example manufacturing, agriculture, services, energy, and infrastructure. In addition to discussions of regional differences within Brazil, socio-economic dimensions are examined. These include income distribution, human capital, environmental issues, and health. Also included is a discussion of Brazil in the world economy, such as the increase in "South-South" cooperation and trade as well as foreign direct investment. Last but not least is a discussion of the role of the Brazilian state in the economy, whether through state enterprises, competition policy, or corruption.

Contact: anna.grimaldi@kcl.ac.uk

To attend, please register.

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CALL FOR PAPERS

Multilingual Literatures. Interdisciplinary Conference
Gregynog Hall, Nr. Newtown, Wales [www.gregynog.org]
17 - 19 July 2019

DEADLINE 31 December 2018

Keynote Speakers

Conference Website: https://multilingualliteratures.wordpress.com/

Knowledge of multiple languages was once common for most writers who chose their idiom according to the purpose of their text and its intended readership. It has been argued that it was only with the rise of the nation state in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and its dependence on a unique Sprachgeist (Herder) that literary production came to be coupled to a national tongue (Anderson). In the current age of globalisation, knowledge of another language is increasingly rare among Anglophone writers, while in other parts of the world an ability to use English as a second language is a basic skill. In literary expression translated English genres and styles threaten to crowd out native or mother-tongue traditions (Mizumura), while English simultaneously absorbs outside influences and Anglophone readers shun translations.

This conference sets out to explore diverging trends across minor and major languages, especially those with an established presence in Europe with respect to individual authors or literary periods, extending from the Medieval to the contemporary. 

It addresses the following questions:

Themes may include:

Proposal Submissions

Proposals for papers or panels in languages other than English are welcome. We are planning to publish a selection of the papers.  Please send the following details by 31 December 2018 to the conference organisers:

Some bursaries are available for postgraduate students.

Conference Organisers

Advisory Board

Multilingual Literatures is part of the Cross-Languages Dynamics: Reshaping Communities  Project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council through the Open World Research Initiative. http://projects.alc.manchester.ac.uk/cross-language-dynamics/


Exploring the Transnational Neighbourhood: Integration, Community, and Co-Habitation
UCD Humanities Institute, University College Dublin
24 - 26 June 2019

DEADLINE 10 January 2019

This conference is held in collaboration with the Institute of Modern Languages Research, School of Advanced Study, University of London, and supported by OWRI Cross-Language Dynamics: Reshaping Community.

Global mass migration on an unprecedented scale; dangerous journeys across the Mediterranean by refugees fleeing persecution and warfare; the loss of family and friends; the loss of home; the challenge of integrating the arrivants / arrivantes; and conflicting notions of identity and belonging - these are some of the transcultural predicaments of the globalisation processes of the 21st century coming to a head in the local encounters of urban (and rural) neighbourhoods. Whereas Singapore's Holland Village, London's Brixton and Berlin's Kreuzberg have grown into trendy multi- and transcultural neighbourhoods coined by creativity and a newly affluent cosmopolitan class, others seem troubled by disenfranchisement, discord, and/or feelings of social dislocation, with Molenbeek in Brussels and the Clichy-sous-Bois banlieue in Paris being perhaps the most notorious examples.

Transnational neighbourhoods are frequently depicted as the ‘other' and as Gillian Jein notes a 'deviant terrain'. However, voices from within often emphasise different perceptions and have the potential to challenge and counter discourses emerging in the context of the rapid rise of populist right-wing parties across Europe that aim to reinstate or ‘protect' ethnic nationalism, Christianity as the dominant religion, a national language and organic culture, ancestry and lineage, and membership of a dominant ethnic or racial group as the bases for national membership. The current political debate is highly polarised, binary and often dominated by quantitative arguments concerning the number of refugees, and the social, economic and political impact of their integration. Against this backdrop, our conference seeks to shift focus by exploring transcultural encounters in the urban neighbourhood. 

We posit that the urban neighbourhood is a social microcosm that allows for a more nuanced discussion of transculturality as lived practice. The urban neighbourhood is local but not provincial; it is a fluid space in which various temporal and spatial axes intersect; it is the locus where diverse trans/cultural practices can engender togetherness as well as differences and conflict. It is the contact zone where disparate cultures meet in often highly asymmetrical relations, fostering processes of hybridisation, creolisation and neoculturation. The neighbourhood is open to the type of multi-scalar perspective that, according to Ann Rigney, avoids entrapment in a binary discourse. 

The urban neighbourhood lends itself to a broad multi-perspectival and interdisciplinary exploration of transcultural practices We invite papers from a broad range of disciplines and fields, including urban geography, urban planning, architecture, memory studies, film studies, visual and performance arts, contemporary literary studies, cultural studies, sociology, practice-based research and linguistics. Possible lines of investigation include: 

Please send an abstract of approx. 250 words and a short biographical note of about 50 words to: m.rocalizarazu@bham.ac.ukbritta.jung@ucd.ie, and stephan.ehrig@ucd.ie

For full details of this event and how to submit your abstracts, please click here.

Conference Organisers:

Prof. Anne Fuchs, UCD Humanities Institute, University College Dublin (anne.fuchs@ucd.ie)
Dr. Godela Weiss-Sussex, IMLR, University of London/King's College Cambridge (godela.weiss-sussex@sas.ac.uk)
Dr. Britta C. Jung, IRC Postdoctoral Fellow, UCD Humanities Institute, University College Dublin(britta.jung@ucd.ie)
Dr. Maria Roca Lizarazu, Leverhulme Early Career Fellow, University of Birmingham (m.rocalizarazu@bham.ac.uk)
Dr. Stephan Ehrig, IRC Postdoctoral Fellow, UCD Humanities Institute, University College Dublin (stephan.ehrig@ucd.ie)


The Forum Prize 2019
Literature and Childhood

DEADLINE 26 April 2019

The Forum for Modern Language Studies invites submissions on the subject of  Literature and Childhood for the ForumPrize 2019 competition.

In a world where daily experience is increasingly shaped by interaction with technology, mobility and migration, and environmental anxiety, the ways in which we view and conceptualize the world of childhood have shifted in response to these changed realities. Yet although childhood, depending on the cultural context, is becoming variously burdened with this century’s tech-savvy consumerism, with a sense of environmental crisis and with the effects of conflict and migration, there are still many continuities with the childhood imagining and narratives of former generations. The editors of Forum for Modern Language Studies invite submissions dealing with any topic pertaining to the theme of Literature and Childhood, within the broad field ofFMLS’s normal remit (literature and culture in the languages covered by the journal).

Topics may include, but are not confined to:


Submissions may address relevant aspects of the language, literature and culture of any of the subject areas covered by the journal: Arabic, English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish and Russian. The competition is open to all researchers, whether established or early career. 
Previous competitions have been won by scholars in both categories. 

The winner will receive: 

1. Publication of the winning essay in the next appropriate volume of Forum for Modern Language Studies 
2. A prize of £500 

A panel of judges will read all entries, which will be assessed anonymously. At the judges’ discretion, a runner-up prize of £200 may be awarded. The Editors may commission for publication in Forum for Modern Language Studies any entries that are highly commended by the judges.

Entry requirements and Submission details for The Forum Prize 2019 

The closing date for entries is Friday 26 April 2019.

Entries must be written in English, be between 6,000 and 10,000 words in length (including notes), should conform to MHRA style, and must be accompanied by an abstract (approx. 150 words) summarising the principal arguments and making clear the relevance of the article to the competition topic.

Articles should be submitted online at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/fmls, be flagged as ForumPrize entries, and follow the journal’s instructions to authors.

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BOOKS

The Violence of Democracy: Political Life in Postwar El Salvador
by Ainhoa Montoya

Readers can enjoy a 20% discount off the printed book or eBook for a limited period using the following discount codes:
PM18TWENTY4 - valid Oct 9, 2018 – Nov 6, 2018

To purchase a copy or for further information please visit: https://www.palgrave.com/gb/book/9783319763293#aboutBook

This book offers novel insights into the ability of a democracy to accommodate violence. Based on ethnographic research, it argues that war legacies and the country’s neoliberalization have enabled an intricate entanglement of violence and political life.

The book explores the clandestine connections between violent entrepreneurs and political actors, the blurring of the licit and illicit through the consolidation of economies of violence, and the reenactment of latent wartime conflicts and political cleavages during postwar electoral seasons. The author also discusses the potential for grassroots memory work and a political party shift to foster hopeful visions of the future and, ultimately, transform the country’s violent democracy.

Beautifully written and deeply troubling...”
-- Daniel M. Goldstein (Professor of Anthropology, Rutgers University, USA)

Ainhoa Montoya’s rigorous ethnography of both political ritual and everyday life is unmatched in postconflict studies.
-- Ellen Moodie (Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA)


The Anti-Black City: Police Terror and Black Urban Life in Brazil
by Jaime Amparo Alves

http://www.combinedacademic.co.uk/the-anti-black-city

While Black Lives Matter still resonates in the United States, the movement has also become a potent rallying call worldwide, with harsh police tactics and repressive state policies often breaking racial lines. In The Anti-Black City, Jaime Amparo Alves delves into the dynamics of racial violence in Brazil, where poverty, unemployment, residential segregation, and a biased criminal justice system create urban conditions of racial precarity. The Anti-Black City provocatively offers race as a vital new lens through which to view violence and marginalization in the supposedly “raceless” São Paulo. Ironically, in a context in which racial ambiguity makes it difficult to identify who is black and who is white, racialized access to opportunities and violent police tactics establish hard racial boundaries through subjugation and death. Drawing on two years of ethnographic research in prisons and neighborhoods on the periphery of this mega-city, Alves documents the brutality of police tactics and the complexity of responses deployed by black residents, including self-help initiatives, public campaigns against police violence, ruthless gangs, and self-policing of communities. The Anti-Black City reveals the violent and racist ideologies that underlie state fantasies of order and urban peace in modern Brazil. Illustrating how “governing through death” has become the dominant means for managing and controlling ethnic populations in the neoliberal state, Alves shows that these tactics only lead to more marginalization, criminality, and violence. Ultimately, Alves’s work points to a need for a new approach to an intractable problem: how to govern populations and territories historically seen as “ungovernable.”

Jaime Amparo Alves is assistant professor of sociology and anthropology at the College of Staten Island of the City University of New York and associate researcher at the Centro de Estudios Afrodiaspóricos of Universidad Icesi/Colombia.

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STUDENT FUNDING

Wellcome Research Fellowships in Humanities and Social Sciences
Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, University of Liverpool

DEADLINE see below

Now open - the Wellcome Research Fellowships in Humanities and Social Science scheme, which offers postdoctoral positions providing salary and research expenses for up to three years. The department has identified key areas of activity within the Wellcome remit and is seeking to support applicants who contribute our key areas of research excellence. Our vision of research excellence within Modern Languages is founded on our expertise in interrogating transfers across cultural boundaries – be they national, social, ethnic, linguistic, or disciplinary in nature – in order to contribute to and lead research projects that work with an explicit awareness of and directly problematise language use beyond the Anglophone world.

The department particularly welcomes applications in the following areas:

The Department of Modern Languages and Cultures comprises academic staff working across a wide range of language-based studies covering literature, new media, film, history, politics, culture and sociolinguistics. Alongside FrenchGermanHispanic StudiesItalianLatin American Studies and Chinese, the department also offers Film Studies. The Department is an active participant in the School’s inter-disciplinary research centres, including the Centre for the Study of International Slavery, the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and the Eighteenth-Century Worlds research centre. Since 2010, we have been part of the School of Histories, Languages and Cultures, one of four Schools in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Application Procedure and Deadlines

Interested candidates should submit by Friday 23 November 2018 an expression of interest using the proforma from the Wellcome Trust to hlcrsch@liverpool.ac.uk.

Applicants will be informed by Friday 30 November if their application is to be supported by the department.

Finalized applications must be submitted to the Wellcome Trust by 11 January 2019 using the Wellcome Trust application form available at: https://wellcome.ac.uk/funding/research-fellowships-humanities-and-social-science  


Northern Bridge Doctoral Training Partnership PhD Studentships in French; German; Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies; and Interpreting and Translation
Newcastle University

DEADLINE 9 January 2019 (17.00 GMT)

The Northern Bridge Doctoral Training Partnership invites top-calibre applicants to apply to its 2018/19 doctoral studentships competition. More than seventy fully-funded doctoral studentships are available across the full range of arts and humanities subjects, including French; German; Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies; and Interpreting and Translation.

Northern Bridge is an exciting, AHRC-funded collaboration between Newcastle University, Durham University, Queen’s University Belfast, Ulster University, Northumbria University, Sunderland University, and Teesside University. Our aim is to deliver outstanding doctoral education in the arts and humanities, and successful applicants will join a thriving cohort of almost fifty Northern Bridge PhD students recruited through last year’s studentship competition. Northern Bridge offers exceptional supervision by academic staff researching at the cutting edge of their disciplines, vibrant research environments that promote interdisciplinary enquiry, and research training and career development opportunities tailored to the needs of twenty-first-century researchers.

Spanish, Portuguese, and Latin American Studies offers supervision in the following areas:

Subject contact: Dr Dunja Fehimović (dunja.fehimovic@newcastle.ac.uk

Please see our website for more information about the School of Modern Languages at Newcastle. Please note that there will be an applicant masterclass at Newcastle University on Wednesday 21 November 2018. Booking in advance is essential.

Northern Bridge students benefit from our close partnerships with prestigious local and national organisations in the cultural, heritage, broadcasting, and government sectors. Our partners provide a wide range of placement, research, and training opportunities, and currently comprise: BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art; BBC Northern Ireland; Belfast City Council; Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure NI; Durham Cathedral; Historic England; National Science and Media Museum; New Writing North; Newcastle City Council; Sage Gateshead; Seven Stories National Centre for Children’s Books; The Bowes Museum; Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums; and Wordsworth Trust.

We provide a comprehensive and attractive package of financial support over the duration of study, which incorporates:

For further details, please see:


AHRC and ESRC postgraduate funding in Hispanic and Latin American Studies at the University of Liverpool
Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, University of Liverpool

DEADLINES see below

Now open - a range of studentships for autumn 2019 entry.

Research activity in Hispanic and Latin American Studies covers a broad range of areas and staff offer specialist supervision on any approved aspect of the languages, literatures, cultures or civilisations of Spain, Portugal and Latin America. Our research is characterised by interdisciplinary breadth as well as geographical scope. We are particularly interested to hear from potential doctoral students working in the areas of gender, race, media histories, digital culture, migration, film studies, history, politics and literature, although other research areas are also welcomed. The topic and nature of the research are decided by students in consultation with staff. More information about the research culture and staff research interests in Hispanic and Latin American Studies may be found here: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/modern-languages-and-cultures/staff/.

The Department of Modern Languages and Cultures comprises academic staff working across a wide range of language-based studies covering literature, new media, film, history, politics, culture and sociolinguistics. Alongside French, German, Hispanic Studies, Italian, Latin American Studies and Chinese, the department also offers Film Studies. The Department is an active participant in the School’s inter-disciplinary research centres, including the Centre for the Study of International Slavery, the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and the Eighteenth-Century Worlds research centre.

Funding options

The AHRC North West Consortium Doctoral Training Partnership offers funding for PhD (+3 or +2) through the Modern Languages and Translation Pathway and the Language-Based Area Studies Pathway. More information is available on the NWCDTP’s website.

The Language-Based Area Studies Pathway of the ESRC North West Social Science Doctoral Training Partnership offers MRes + PhD (1+3 years) and PhD (+3) studentships in Latin American Studies in Liverpool. More information on is available on the NWSSDTP’s website.

Deadline and Application Process

To apply for an AHRC or ESRC award, you must have submitted your admissions application for an eligible programme at the University of Liverpool through the online form by 10 December 2018https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying/.

More information

Those interested in applying are strongly encouraged to contact their prospective supervisors well in advance of the deadline. Prospective applicants are also encourage to attend our Postgraduate Research Open Day on 7 November, 1-4pm, Vine Court, University of Liverpool. The PGR Open Day includes sessions on research proposals, AHRC, ESRC and other funding sources.

Contact

Those interested in applying can contact Dr Marieke Riethof (mriethof@liverpool.ac.uk).


Northern Bridge Doctoral Training Partnership PhD Studentships in French; German; Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies; and Interpreting and Translation
Newcastle University

DEADLINE 9 January 2019 (17.00 GMT)

The Northern Bridge Doctoral Training Partnership invites top-calibre applicants to apply to its 2018/19 doctoral studentships competition. More than seventy fully-funded doctoral studentships are available across the full range of arts and humanities subjects, including French; German; Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies; and Interpreting and Translation.

Northern Bridge is an exciting, AHRC-funded collaboration between Newcastle University, Durham University, Queen’s University Belfast, Ulster University, Northumbria University, Sunderland University, and Teesside University. Our aim is to deliver outstanding doctoral education in the arts and humanities, and successful applicants will join a thriving cohort of almost fifty Northern Bridge PhD students recruited through last year’s studentship competition. Northern Bridge offers exceptional supervision by academic staff researching at the cutting edge of their disciplines, vibrant research environments that promote interdisciplinary enquiry, and research training and career development opportunities tailored to the needs of twenty-first-century researchers.

Spanish, Portuguese, and Latin American Studies offers supervision in the following areas:

Subject contact: Dr Dunja Fehimović (dunja.fehimovic@newcastle.ac.uk

Please see our website for more information about the School of Modern Languages at Newcastle. Please note that there will be an applicant masterclass at Newcastle University on Wednesday 21 November 2018. Booking in advance is essential.

Northern Bridge students benefit from our close partnerships with prestigious local and national organisations in the cultural, heritage, broadcasting, and government sectors. Our partners provide a wide range of placement, research, and training opportunities, and currently comprise: BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art; BBC Northern Ireland; Belfast City Council; Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure NI; Durham Cathedral; Historic England; National Science and Media Museum; New Writing North; Newcastle City Council; Sage Gateshead; Seven Stories National Centre for Children’s Books; The Bowes Museum; Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums; and Wordsworth Trust.

We provide a comprehensive and attractive package of financial support over the duration of study, which incorporates:

For further details, please see:

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GRANTS

Fieldwork Grants Programme
Fundación WWB Colombia Research Fund (Women’s World Banking Network)

DEADLINE 13 November 2018

Introduction

Fundación WWB Colombia's strategic planning for 2017-2020 proposes for its fourth goal to "support research projects that enable the identification of challenges and opportunities for women entrepreneurs in Colombia." One of the mechanisms for the achievement of this goal is the creation and development of a research fund. With this goal in mind, Fundación WWB Colombia presents the second call (version II-2018) for the funding of research projects, for a total of COP $895,000,000. Through this action, the Foundation affirms its commitment to building the necessary knowledge for social change that promotes higher levels of inclusion in democratic societies. 

For this second version of the call, we propose as its main goal to promote research projects that propose the study of the dynamics, tensions, ideas, relations, conflicts, challenges, and opportunities for entrepreneurship led by or with the participation of women in rural contexts.

Fundación WWB Colombia Research Fund

A total of 15 research grants will be allocated. The funding is available for research, social innovation, and technological development projects focusing on contexts for rural entrepreneurship in relation to women's empowerment.

This call is aimed at supporting dissertation projects of MA or PhD students of any nationality as well as research projects of research groups from any country which field sites are located in Valle del Cauca and Cauca, Colombia, as well as other field sites in Colombia or/and abroad in the case of comparative research projects.

Applications deadline: 13th of November, 2018 (applications must be submitted online)

Grantees to be announced in April, 2019

Research Fund’s Website: http://fondoparalainvestigacion.fundacionwwbcolombia.org

Questions can be addressed to: fondoinvestigacion@fundacionwwbcol.org 


Now Open, Grant Applications for The British Library’s Endangered Archives Programme (EAP)

DEADLINES see below

The British Library is now inviting grant applications to the Endangered Archives Programme, in the hopes of enabling researchers to locate culturally important but vulnerable archival collections in areas of the world where resources are limited, to arrange their transfer wherever possible to a suitable local archival home, and to deliver digital copies into the international research domain via the British Library. Collections might be vulnerable due to general neglect, poor storage, damaging environmental conditions, or wanton destruction.

Since its establishment in 2004, the Programme has supported over 350 projects across 90 countries worldwide, resulting in over 6.5 million images and 25 thousand sound tracks being preserved. In addition to being accessible through local archival partners, this growing archive of endangered material is available freely online via the EAP website for the benefit of researchers everywhere. Click here to explore the digital archive.

For full details about the application process, please click here.

If you might be interested in submitting an application, please join us online for a live Q&A session, where previously successful applicants and EAP staff members will answer your questions about all aspects of the application process: Live Q&A Webinar, Friday 2 November 2018, 15.00 - 16.00 GMT.

To register for the webinar, please email endangeredarchives@bl.uk

Key dates for the application process

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JOBS

Visiting Fellowships 2019
Canning House and King's College London

DEADLINE 1 December 2018

We are delighted to announce a new programme of Visiting Fellowships which Canning House in association with King’s College London has initiated from 2019.

Canning House is the UK’s leading forum for informed comment, contacts and debate on Latin American politics, economics and business and was established in 1943. Canning House hosts a wide range of activities including in-depth publications on developments and trends in Latin America; conferences, seminars and off-the-record events with ministers, ambassadors, senior officials, business and government leaders from Latin America and the UK; and a Cultural Programme which attracts the very best historians, writers and cultural figures.

King’s College London was established in 1829 and today is a multi-faculty, multi-campus university. It has had a relationship with Canning House since its foundation which continues today. King’s has been teaching Spanish and Portuguese since the nineteenth century and has significant partnerships with South American universities and cultural institutions.

In 2012 the Library of Canning House, which comprised some 54,000 volumes, joined the already significant Latin American collections at King’s Library which now forms one of the most extensive Latin American collections in the UK. Covering almost every aspect of the civilization and culture of all of the Spanish and Portuguese speaking countries of the world, the collection has particular strengths in the areas of history, international relations and above all literature.

Canning House in association with King’s has established two Visiting Fellowships a year and is now welcoming applications for the spring 2019 and Autumn 2019 Fellowships. These Fellowships will be based at the Maughan Library of King’s College London for a period of up to three months, with the responsibility of completing a research project drawing on the collections housed in the Library. London has very many academic libraries and access to these will be possible where necessary to supplement the collections housed at King’s.

Towards the end of the Fellowship, the Fellow will be expected to lead a seminar or give a lecture in either the Department of Spanish Portuguese and Latin American Studies or the Brazil Institute at King’s about the research undertaken during the Fellowship, and additionally to lead a discussion on the chosen topic at an event at Canning House for their members and guests, who are drawn predominantly from the business and diplomatic communities here in the UK.

The Visiting Fellowship is to commence either in March or September, and it includes air transport to and from the UK via our partner airline Air Europa and a monthly stipend of £2,500 for the duration of the Fellow’s stay in London.

The research project undertaken should fall within one of the following thematic areas:

  1. Migration between Europe and Latin America from 1800 to the presentits history and political, social and economic impacts - with a special focus on Britain as a source or recipient of migration.
  2. Women’s rights in Latin America, Iberia and the UK over the past 100 years, including historical, political, social and economic dimensions.
  3. Slavery and forced labour (historic and modern) – in Latin America, Iberia and the UK.
  4. The Sports Diaspora – sport-driven transfers between Latin America and Europe (esp. UK) and their impact on sports (especially but not exclusively football).
  5. Favelas in Brazil and similar low-income urban communities in Hispano-America – the history of their development, modern characteristics and social and economic impacts, and comparative perspectives including the UK.
  6. Race and opportunity: a comparative history of the development of racial and indigenous rights, their protection and promotion in Latin America, Iberia and the UK.

If you wish to be considered for the Fellowship, please send an outline (800 words maximum) of your proposed research, indicating its aims and outcomes, and its connection to one of the themes set out above. For the Fellowship commencing March 2019, the deadline is 1 December 2018, and for the Fellowship commencing in September 2019, the deadline is 1 June 2019. Applications should be sent to federico.bonaddio@kcl.ac.uk

Enquiries regarding the scheme may be directed to Cristina Cortes at Canning House (cristina.cortes@canninghouse.org) or Dr Federico Bonaddio at King’s College London Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies (federico.bonaddio@kcl.ac.uk). 

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