SLAS E-Newsletter, March 2017

The eNewsletter is compiled and sent out to you by Christy Palmer. If you have an up-coming event or items that you would like included in the next eNewsletter, then please send the details to: christy_palmer@mac.com

PLEASE NOTE: not all 'Call for Papers', are listed in the section 'Call for Papers'. Many are within the conference and seminar notices in the 'Conference and Seminars' section of the eNewsletter. All deadlines have been highlighted or emboldened in red.

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NOTICE BOARD

Annual PILAS Conference, Accommodation Grants

DEADLINE 1 April 2017

PILAS is offering a limited number of accommodation grants for accepted delegates attending our Annual Conference 2017. Single ensuite rooms for 3 nights and breakfast will be provided by PILAS at Storm Jameson Court, University of Leeds.

Grant recipients are expected to attend for the whole of the 2 day conference and may be invited to act as Chairs and/or Discussants for a panels . Grants will be awarded based on the quality of the personal statement and the paper/panel proposal. These grants cannot be exchanged for cash.

The deadline is 1st April 2017. In order to apply for one of these grants, you should have already submitted a contribution proposal (paper or panel) and complete the following form: https://pilasconference.com/pilas-conference-accommodation-grants/


Ibero American Cinema Grants

DEADLINE 15 April 2017

If you are interested in Ibero American Cinema, you can apply for a Spanish Film Club Grant to bring a film festival to your campus. Grants cover between 30% and 50% of the costs. And you will get programming advice, as well as the possibility of scheduling a Q&A with a filmmaker. Simply fill out the online application form: https://pragda.com/spanish-film-club/.

Twice a year, Spanish Film Club offers grants to help universities bring the very best in contemporary Ibero American cinema to campuses and to introduce students to the language and cultures of these territories.
Universities select a minimum of five films from a catalog of more than 40 titles to create a film festival on campus. Representing 21 countries, the films have been carefully selected by a team of experts and are backed by the most important festivals and film critics.

New films this cycle include award-winning titles like:

To learn more about the program and apply to bring a SPANISH FILM CLUB festival to your campus, visit https://pragda.com/spanish-film-club/.

TOP

CONFERENCES & SEMINARS

‘In Conversation with George Ciccariello-Maher’
Vera Anstey Room, LSE Old Building, Houghton Street, WC2A 2AE
6 March 2017 | 17.00 onwards

Chair: Dr. William Booth (Radical Americas Network and LSE)

Author of 'We Created Chavez: A People's History of the Venezuelan Revolution' (Duke University Press, 2013), 'Building the Commune: Radical Democracy in Venezuela' (Verso, 2016) and 'Decolonizing Dialectics' (Duke University Press, 2017), George Ciccariello-Maher is Assistant Professor in the Department of Politics at Drexel University. In conversation with Dr. William Booth (Radical Americas Network and LSE), Dr. Ciccariello-Maher will discuss the current state of the Bolivarian revolution in Venezuela, as well as his new book - which brings the theories of Sorel, Fanon and Dussel to a Venezuelan context - and the challenges for radical academics in the current conjuncture.

This event is free, but please RSVP to radicalamericas@gmail.com so that we can monitor numbers. This event is facilitated by the Radical Americas Network and the LSE Department of International History.

W: radicalamericas.org / lse.ac.uk/internationalhistory
T: @radicalamericas / @lsehistory
E: radicalamericas@gmail.com / ih.ug.admin@lse.ac.uk


Histories of a Plague Year: Population, Health and Colonial Government
IHR Peter Marshall Room, N204, Second Floor, IHR, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU
7 March 2017 | 17:30 - 19:30

Speaker: Gabriela Ramos (University of Cambridge).

Studies in Andean population history concur in considering 1720 a watershed for determining periods of decline and growth (Dobyns 1963, Whightman 1990). After 1720, the Spanish colonial government launched a series of reforms aimed at improving revenue collection and governmental efficacy, especially by conducting new, accurate population counts. Through the study of reports about a mysterious epidemic that struck the Peruvian viceroyalty in the early eighteenth century, this paper investigates the significance of the year 1720 for the Andean population.

For questions about attendance or other issues, please contact IHR Reception: ihr.reception@sas.ac.uk OR 020 7862 8740.


'Building Latin America as Brand'
Common Room, Department of Spanish, Portuguese & Latin American Studies, Foster Court 307, UCL
8 March 2017 | 17.00 onwards

The next talk in the UCL Spanish, Portuguese & Latin American Studies Research Seminar Series.

Speaker: Felix Lossio Chavez (Newcastle University)
Discussant: Paulo Drinot (UCL)

Developed by many governments since the last years of the 20th century, place branding strategies have as their ultimate aim the strengthening of a competitive and distinctive country in the global market. Simultaneously, a fundamental aspect of these strategies has to do with the production of national narratives and models of citizenship oriented towards the strengthening of national self-esteem and sense of belonging among their citizens.

Nonetheless, contrary to precious projects of citizenship construction and nation building, nation branding is socially anchored in the logics of postmodern neoliberalism, in the languages and knowledges related to marketing and management, and in advertisers, branding consultants and tourist operators as the privileged actors of the field’s locus of enunciation. Therefore, a tension emerges between, on one side, the need to strengthen the “competitive identity” and improve the country’s global positioning; and, on the other, the construction of a shared national identity and sense of belonging.

In Latin America, this has not been the exemption and, since the early years of the 21st century, governments such as Peru (Marca Peru, 2011), Colombia (Colombia is Passion, 2006, The Answer is Colombia, 2011) Cuba (Authentic Cuba, 2011), Ecuador (Ecuador Loves Life, 2010) o Chile (Chile Always Surprising 2006), among many others; have decidedly promoted nation branding strategies from their ministries of Tourism, Commerce and Investment in association with global consultancies. In these cases, the national narratives promise sensorial experiences through the central presence of areas such as gastronomy, music, nature or the “authenticity” or “passion” of the region; all of which has activated both support and collective appropriation of the brand narratives and its visual identities by local citizens, along with resistances and counter narratives from actors discontent with the suggested brand.

In any case, it is clear that nation brand strategies have acquired a protagonist role in the way that national identities are narrated, activating inn doing so a public discussion about the current significance of the nation. Because of this, the aim of this conference is to examine the Latin American nation-brands, paying special attention to the cases of Peru, Cuba and Colombia and with minor examples of Ecuador and Chile. From this, this conference aims to discuss the tensions and disputes emerging in Latin America about the nation from branding field.

All welcome! The seminar will be followed by a wine reception.


Between Political Intervention and Personal Inscription: Women Writers in Latin America 1880-1930
Institute of Modern Languages Research, Room 234, Second Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
8 March 2017 | 18:00 onwards

Speaker: Professor Mónica Szurmuk (CONICET, Argentina)

In the late nineteenth century, as the new Latin American republics were consolidating, a group of women became professionalized in relation to these emerging states. These professional women were agents and beneficiaries of modernisation processes in the region that started in the mid-nineteenth century and crystallised in the first decades of the twentieth century.

In this talk the professionalisation of women (in the fields of literature, education, journalism, and science) will be treated in the context of the construction of modern national states in the region. A particular focus is on how lettered culture housed these new professionals, and how women sought out literature as a place to record their professional as well as their personal experiences. Through an analysis of these women's roles within modernization, state formation, and the creation of state apparatuses, it is hoped that they will be shown as active participants in collective action, rather than as eccentric personalities, pioneers, or rebels.

Mónica Szurmuk is author of Mujeres en viaje and Women in Argentina, Early Travel Narratives and the editor of Memoria y ciudadanía, the Dictionary of Latin American Cultural Studies, Sitios de la memoria: México después del ´68 (Cuarto Propio, 2015) and the Cambridge History of Latin American Women’s Literature.

Event free - all welcome


Building the Modern State in Developing Countries: Understanding the Relationship between Security and Taxes with Evidence from Mexico
UCL Institute of the Americas, 51 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PN
9 March 2017 | 18.15

Speaker: Dr. Gustavo Flores-Macias (Cornell University)

This article provides novel micro-level evidence of the relationship between two central aspects of state capacity, taxation and the provision of law and order. Drawing on an original nationally-representative survey conducted in the context of Mexico’s war on drugs, we estimate through a novel technique the size of the fiscal sacrifice citizens are willing to make to improve public safety, and investigate the determinants of attitudes towards heavier taxation for this end.

Contrary to expectations from the literatures on victimization and state intervention as risk mitigation, we find that willingness to pay taxes to reduce crime is driven by perceptions of nationwide public safety: those with more intense feelings of insecurity are less inclined to pay.

Dr. Gustavo Flores-Macias is an Associate Professor of Government at Cornell University. His research focuses on two main areas: 1) the politics of economic reform, and 2) taxation and state capacity. Work related to these interests has appeared or is forthcoming in the American Political Science Review, Comparative Politics, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Journal of Democracy, Journal of Politics, Peace Review, Political Science Quarterly, Studies in Comparative International Development, and as chapters in edited volumes. His book, After Neoliberalism? The Left and Economic Reforms in Latin America (Oxford University Press 2012), studies the economic policies of left-of-center governments in Latin America, focusing on the role that party systems play in facilitating or hindering economic transformations. The book won the Latin American Studies Association Tomassini Award in 2014.

Attendance is free of charge but registration is required.


Art and Anthropology: Contributions from Latin America
Room 246, Second Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
9 March 2017 | 13.00 - 14.00

Speaker: Dr Guiliana Borea (PUCP, Lima & ILAS, SAS)

More information to follow. This event is free but advanced booking is required. To book your place please use this link: http://sas.sym-online.com/registrationforms/ilasbooking15617/.

For more information about this event and any other being held or organised by ILAS, please contact Olga Jimenez (olga.jimenez@sas.ac.uk OR 020 7862 8833).


'My Tongue is the Blast of a Gun’: The Midnight Robber and the Carnival Trickster Tradition
Room G21A, Ground Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
09 March 2017 | 17.30 - 19.30

Speaker: Dr Emily Zobel Marshall (Leeds Beckett University)

Convenor: William Tantam, Postdoctoral Fellow (Institute of Latin American Studies)

This event is free but advanced booking is required. To book your place please use this link: http://sas.sym-online.com/registrationforms/ilasbooking1559915702/.

For more information about this event a, please contact Enquiries
(william.tantam@sas.ac.uk OR 020 7862 8833).


After the thaw: cultural approaches to research on Cuba
University of Edinburgh, Old College, South Bridge, Edinburgh EH8 9YL
10 March 2017 | 14.30 - 16.30

This seminar series, with the support ILAS Regional Seminar Grant Series, jointly organized by the University of Edinburgh and the University of Newcastle, follows the recent détente between the USA and Cuba to discuss the implications of the thaw to Cuba. Departing from an approach to Cuban cultural politics and its historic consequences for economic, scientific and international relations, several experts on contemporary Cuban Studies address in the series the complex dynamics of Cuban cultural production in a globalised context, analysing the impact of health and education in and beyond the island; and how Cuba can lead the way in the region in sustaining impressive accomplishments in human development, departing from examples in the arts, culture, and science.

Emily Morris (University College London) & Kepa Artaraz (University of Brighton).

With the support of ILAS – Institute of Latin American Studies (School of Advanced Study London), Centre for Contemporary Latin American Studies at the University of Edinburgh and the Centre for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Newcastle University.

Please contact the organisers to register: Raquel Ribeiro, Raquel.ribeiro@ed.ac.uk OR 020 7862 8833.


Politics, Gender and Health: Insight from Argentina's Provinces
UCL Institute of the Americas, 51 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PN
13 March 2017 | 17.30 onwards

Speaker: Professor James McGuire (Wesleyan University)

Is greater political representation for women associated with better health outcomes? Previous research has linked women's legislative representation to greater public health care spending, more widespread use of basic health care services, and better health status. Most such research has been carried out, however, either at the cross-national level or across subnational units (states, districts) in the United States or India. This study explores the association between women's legislative representation and health outcomes in the provinces of Argentina.

To an unusual degree, provincial governments in Argentina control health care spending, health service provision, and other interventions relevant to health status. Provincial legislatures also very widely both across the country and over time in the share of legislative seats held by women. The study's central finding is that a greater share of provincial legislative seats held by women is associated with fewer births outside medical facilities and lower infant and maternal mortality.

James McGuire is Professor of Government and Chair of the Department of Government at Wesleyan University (USA). He holds a PhD from the University of California-Berkeley and has published widely on Latin American politics, including Peronism without Perón: Unions, Parties, and Democracy in Argentina (1997) and Wealth, Health, and Democracy in East Asia and Latin America (2010).

The Department of International Development at Kings College London and UCL Institute of the Americas are pleased to co-sponsor this event. Attendance is free of charge but registration is required.


Shaping Nature, Shaping Humans. Entwined Landscapes in Latin America.
University of Edinburgh, Project Room (AM) Screening Room (PM), 50 George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9LH
13 March, 2017 | 10.00 - 19.00

The 2017 Latin American Cultural Colloquium is organized by the Centre for Contemporary Latin American Studies and the Latin American Society (EUSA) at University of Edinburgh. The full programme and how to book can be found on this events Eventbrite page. So please do join us for an exciting range of interdisciplinary perspectives on the dynamic relationship between humans and nature.

Entry is free and all are welcome.

Confirmed speakers are:

For more information please contact Charlotte Gleghorn: Charlotte.gleghorn@ed.ac.uk


Thanks to God, Juan, and Evita: Indigenous Leaders, Peronism, and the Argentine Nation-State
Room G21A, Ground Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
15 March 2017 | 17.30 - 19.30

Dr Christine Mathias, Lecturer in Modern Latin American History (King's College London)

In Argentina, many indigenous people have fond memories of President Juan Perón and his second wife Evita, even though Perón himself did little to promote indigenous rights. This paper draws on original archival research to show how indigenous leaders in the 1940s and 1950s embraced the rhetoric of Peronism and the principles of populism. These leaders' political engagement helped to integrate their followers into the Argentine nation-state. It also promoted the spread of evangelical Christianity in some communities. By examining the actions of such understudied intermediaries, we can begin to understand populism's enduring, paradoxical appeal.

This event is free but advanced booking is required. To book your place please use this link: http://sas.sym-online.com/registrationforms/ilasbooking15627/.

For more information about this event and any other being held or organised by ILAS, please contact Olga Jimenez (olga.jimenez@sas.ac.uk OR 020 7862 8833).


Myths and Latin American reality in post-truth times
The Senate Room, First Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
15 March 2017 | 18.30 - 20.00

The new series Thinking Ibero-America invites personalities from this vast cultural region and British experts to share and discuss their visions. The first instalment brings together Mexican novelist Èlmer Mendoza, a representative of the so-called narco-literature, and Dr. Peter Watt, a Hispanist from the University of Sheffield who specialises in human rights and organised crime.

The theme of the talk is the reality of crime and corruption in Mexico and Latin America, its effects on those societies, and how these issues are projected by the media as well as by the novels of Mendoza, especially in this new stage of relations with the United States with Donald Trump as president.

Two of Èlmer Mendoza’s novels have been translated into English: Silver Bullets (MacLehose Press, 2015) and Acid Test (MacLehose Press, 2016). His other novels include Un asesino solitario (A solitary killer, 1999), Efecto tequila (Tequila Effect, 2004), and Besar al detective (Kissing the Detective, 2016). He is also a playwright and professor of Literature at the Autonomous University of Sinaloa.

Dr. Peter Watt is Professor of Hispanic Studies at the University of Sheffield and co-author of Drug War Mexico. Politics, Violence and Neoliberalism in the New Narcoeconomy (Zed Books, 2012).

Languages: Spanish and English (consecutive translation)

The cycle Pensar Iberoamérica is a cooperation between the Instituto Cervantes and Canning House in collaboration with ILAS and IMLR. With the collaboration of MacLehose Press.

To reserve a place, please go to the Canning House webpage: https://www.canninghouse.org/events/myths-latin-american-reality-post-truth-times-conversation-elmer-mendoza-peter-watt/

For more information about this event and any other being held or organised by ILAS, please contact Olga Jimenez (olga.jimenez@sas.ac.uk OR 020 7862 8833).


‘Cuba is already ours’: Annexationists, filibusterers, and the United States’ struggle to buy Cuba, c. 1820-1898
UCL Institute of the Americas, 51 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PN
15 March 2017 | 17.30

Speaker: Dr Carrie Gibson

This paper discusses the many attempts of the United States to buy Cuba from Spain throughout the nineteenth century. Although all the bids ended in failure, each one came at a particular moment of change or crisis, and was set in a much wider global context. The bids in 1853 and 1898 were particularly crucial, coming before and after the abolition of slavery in both places, and this paper will focus on those two in discussing how this period was critical in the development of the relationship between Cuba and the United States.

Dr Carrie Gibson received her PhD from Cambridge in 2011 where her thesis focussed on the impact of the Haitian Revolution on the Spanish Caribbean islands. She has been working as an independent historian, publishing Empire’s Crossroads: A History of the Caribbean from Columbus to the Present Day (Pan Macmillan) in 2014. She has just completed a manuscript on the ‘forgotten’ Hispanic past of the United States, which will be published by Grove Atlantic in 2018. She can be found at @carrieegibson

This event is free of charge but registration is required, as seating is limited.


2 Mayors 2 Cities: Urban Transformation in Cali and Medellín
Keynes Hall, King’s College, Cambridge
15 March 2017 | 14.00 - 18.00

Cali and Medellín (Colombia) have undergone significant urban transformation over the past twenty years, having to overcome complex socio-spatial urban conditions and historical legacies. Since the late 1990s, new political postures emerged amongst a selected group of university professors, who were able to employ their academic experiences in order to tackle the difficult circumstances of their respective cities. With a diachronic perspective, this conference will critically explore their accomplishments, struggles and urban legacy, while reasoning upon the future of these two Latin American cities.

Medellín - Sergio Fajardo holds a PhD in Mathematics, and has taught and published on this subject. Before launching his first political campaign, as mayor of Medellín, he surrounded himself with other academics, including a group of architects and urbanists from Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana de Medellín. As Mayor of Medellín, his main challenge was to turn one of the most violent cities of the world into an inhabitable, more socially just, and commercially viable human environment. The key result was the well-known Proyectos Urbanos Integrales (PUI): a programme of urban intervention whose main purpose was to provide education and recreation, while creating mechanisms to allow greater mobility in the city.

Cali - Rodrigo Guerrero is a doctor and PhD in Epidemiology, who served as President of Universidad del Valle in Cali (1982-84) and as Director of the Fundación Carvajal: a philantropic organisation which offers assistance to deprived communities on the outskirts of Cali. He was elected Mayor of Cali for the first time in 1992, where he used his epidemiological knowledge and clinical experience to devise a system of statistical interpretation that helped the production of more accurate strategies to reduce urban crime. Ultimately, his study produced a new understanding of Cali’s urban geography that would then influence two successive master plans for the city.

Convenors

Kindly supported by:

Free event. Please register here: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/two-mayorstwo-cities-urban-transformation-incali-and-medellin-tickets-32164615230


Withering Pasts or a Rasanblaj of Peculiarities
Vanessa Knights Memorial Lecture
Barbara Strang Teaching Centre 1.46, Newcastle University
16 March 2017 | 17.00 onwards

Speaker: Gina Athena Ulysse, Professor of Anthropology (Wesleyan University)

Using chants, poetry, and photography to confront the past, which looms too largely in the present, Gina Athena Ulysse meditates on historical silences, rebellious rage, and the sacred to affirm ancestral and political imperatives necessary for Black self-determination and self-repossession.

Following the lecture we invite you to join us for a drinks reception. All are welcome, but please register by emailing CLAC.Studies@ncl.ac.uk

This is the second in a series of annual lectures in memory of Vanessa Knights (1969-2007) who was lecturer in Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies at Newcastle University from 1995 until her early death. Vanessa was well known and respected in her field. Her work dealt with Spanish-speaking cultures of the Iberian Peninsula and, especially, Latin America, focusing on music, literature, and popular culture. She published on the bolero, nationalism, diaspora and science fiction, and feminism and women's movements in contemporary Spain and Latin America. She was vice-president of Women in Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies in 2003-2004 and was a member of numerous scholarly organisations.


The Brazilian Amazon, its People and the Circulation of Knowledge
Room 349, Third Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
16 March 2017 | 13.00 - 14.00

Speaker: Dr Mark Harris (University of St Andrews)

Knowledge about the Brazilian Amazon for a global academic community is often associated with indigenous societies and their anthropologists and advocates. In this presentation I will consider other kinds of knowledge practices that complement this headline Amazon. In particular I will examine the construction of the past of the Amazon and the character of materials used to build a regional historiography. This intellectual tradition reveals another Amazon, for sure, and one where collaborative efforts between native and outsider are as significant and profound as they are in more popular contemporary versions. They are, however, hidden from view, buried in an archive that takes various forms.

This event is free but advanced booking is required. To book your place please use this link: http://sas.sym-online.com/registrationforms/ilasbooking15619/.

For more information about this event and any other being held or organised by ILAS, please contact Olga Jimenez (olga.jimenez@sas.ac.uk OR 020 7862 8833).


'My Phone is My Weapon': Independent Media for Human Rights in Complexo do Alemão, Rio de Janeiro
Room 234, Second Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
16 March 2017 | 17.30 - 19.30

Speaker: Charlotte Livingstone (Goldsmiths, University of London)

Coletivo Papo Reto is an independent media collective from Complexo do Alemão, one of the largest favela complexes of Rio de Janeiro. The collective aims to produce media from and about the favela with a human rights ideology, challenging negative media stereotypes and physical and structural violence by the state. Based on collaborative ethnographic research in 2014-2015, this paper explores some of the ways in which the collective works, through a digital, collective and constantly evolving methodology, armed with little more than cell-phones and a Wi-Fi/3G connection. The Coletivo can be considered as one node in a global network of activists challenging racialized state violence who act and organised in the dialectic space between the online and the offline. Yet whilst groups such as Black Lives Matter have had some success in bringing international attention to police killings of black people in the United States, experience of grass-roots activism to draw attention to a much higher frequency of police lethal violence in the favelas of Rio de Janeiro is often met with an epidemic of indifference.

For more information about the seminar, you can visit our blog: http://anthropologyseminarilas.blogs.sas.ac.uk

This event is free but advanced booking is required. To book your place please use this link: http://sas.sym-online.com/registrationforms/ilasbooking15698/.

For more information about this event and any other being held or organised by ILAS, please contact Olga Jimenez (olga.jimenez@sas.ac.uk OR 020 7862 8833).


Does International Solidarity with Latin America work?
Athlone Room 102, First Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
21 March 2017 | 16.00 - 18.00

This workshop will look at the impacts of transnational solidarity with Latin America at home and abroad. What are the consequences of solidarity campaigns on Latin American civil society and governments? How do such campaigns shape the policies of domestic governments and multilateral institutions? Julia Buxton (CEU), Grace Livingstone (ILAS/Cambridge), Elena McGrath (ILAS) and Luciana Zarzoli (CONICET/ILAS) will compare the historical and contemporary consequences of solidarity with Chile, Argentina, Bolivia, and Venezuela, and will discuss the role of international labour organizations. The panel will also explore the ethical dilemmas and unforeseen results of international solidarity actions.

This event will followed by the associated ILAS/ASC/ARN event “Human Rights in Argentina and Chile: Then and Now” from 6:30-8:00pm in Room 347.

This event is free but advanced booking is required. To book your place please use this link: http://sas.sym-online.com/registrationforms/ilasbooking17090/.

For more information about this event and any other being held or organised by ILAS, please contact Olga Jimenez (olga.jimenez@sas.ac.uk OR 020 7862 8833).


Human Rights in Argentina and Chile, Then and Now
Room 349, Third Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
21 March 2017 | 18.30 - 20.00

To mark Argentina’s annual Memory, Truth and Justice Day (on the 24 March 1976 the military dictatorship began) ILAS, the Argentina Solidarity Campaign and the Argentina Research Network will jointly host a range of speakers reflecting on the human rights abuses, mass torture and Disappearances committed by the military dictatorships of the 1970s and 80s. The panel will also reflect and comment on more recent cases such as the illegal detention of activist Milagro Sala. Speakers to include:

This event will be preceded by the associated ILAS event “Does Latin American Solidarity Work?” from 4-6pm in Room 102.

This event is free but advanced booking is required. To book your place please use this link: http://sas.sym-online.com/registrationforms/ilasbooking17088/.

For more information about this event and any other being held or organised by ILAS, please contact Olga Jimenez (olga.jimenez@sas.ac.uk OR 020 7862 8833).


The Ideas Behind the First Estimates of the Argentine Cost of Living Index, 1918-1933
IHR Peter Marshall Room, N204, Second Floor, IHR, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
21 Mar 2017 | 17:30 - 19:30

Speaker: Cecilia Lanata (University of Sussex).

In line with international trends, the cost of living index released in 1918 by Alejandro E. Bunge and published in the Revista de Economía Argentina (Review of the Argentine Economy, REA) was the first Argentine indicator of this kind. The one developed between 1933 and 1935 by the Departamento Nacional de Trabajo (National Labour Department, DNT) headed at the time by José Figuerola was the first one based on a household budget survey.

Both indices have several methodological pitfalls. However, the two estimates are crucial to understand the trajectories of both statisticians. They are also vital in the development of a national macroeconomic vision. This paper analyses, compares and contextualises the ideas behind both series. The contextualisation is both within the national statistical system as well as within the international system of production of public statistics and index numbers. Moreover, the paper examines and contrasts Bunge's and Figuerola's roles and aims as well as their motivations regarding the elaboration of each of the indices. Thus, it shows how both individuals adapted and adopted the ideas developed abroad to the domestic reality and national needs. Lastly, the article analyses the international repercussions of the estimates, arguing that they are linked to the individuals' different roles.

For questions about attendance or other issues, please contact IHR Reception: ihr.reception@sas.ac.uk OR 020 7862 8740.


Urban Protest and Informal Democracy in Venezuela
UCL Institute of the Americas, 51 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PN
22 March 2017 | 17.30 onwards

Speaker: Alejandro Velasco (NYU)

Venezuela today is a country mired in turmoil. But thirty years ago the story was different. Back then Venezuela stood for many as an inclusive democracy in a region where dictatorship and civil war reigned. Enlightened leaders, strong parties, powerful unions – all spoke of a stable political system that for decades managed to ensure social peace. Or so it seemed. As historian Alejandro Velasco argues, the conflicts that grip Venezuela today aren’t a departure from but a continuation of decades-long struggles over what kind of democracy would emerge after the country’s last military dictatorship fell in 1958. Read the full abstract here.

Alejandro Velasco (NYU) is a historian of modern Latin America whose research and teaching interests are in the areas of social movements, urban culture and democratization. His book, Barrio Rising: Urban Popular Politics and the Making of Modern Venezuela (University of California Press, 2015), couples archival and ethnographic research to examine how residents of Venezuela’s largest public housing community pursued full citizenship during the heyday of Latin America’s once-model democracy.

Attendance to this event is free of charge but registration is required.


Changing Tides: An analysis of the 2017 Ecuadorian Presidential election
UCL Institute of the Americas, 51 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PN
23 March 2017 | 18.00

The Latin American Political Economy – LAPE - Seminar Series at the UCL Institute of the Americas continues with a special event co-organized with King’s College Department of International Development to analyse the most recent presidential elections in Ecuador, with three distinguished guest speakers: Mark Keller (The Economist Intelligence Unit), Ian Mason (Foreign and Commonwealth Office) and Andrés Mejía Acosta (KCL) and chaired by Néstor Castañeda (UCL Americas).

The wave of 21st Century Socialism once raised hopes that new forms of participatory democracy could reinvigorate the nature and quality of democratic representation in Latin America. After more than a decade in power, the reality on the ground shows different paths across the countries governed by Left leaning regimes. The 2017 Presidential election marks an important turning point for democracy in the country. With a looming major economic crises and widespread mobilisation, voters have the choice of continuing with the “Citizens revolution” started by Rafael Correa 10 years ago, or to vote for a democratic alternation and renewed separation of powers.

Mark Keller is an analyst at The Economist Intelligence Unit, where he covers Chile, Bolivia, Ecuador, and Haiti, and he is also the consulting analyst on Peru and Cuba. Mark Keller holds a BA from Columbia University and an MSc from the University of Oxford. He has worked with Latin America in various capacities including with regional publications such as Latin Trade, and in thank tanks such as the Council of the Americas and Freedom House in New York.

Ian Mason is a Senior Research Analyst for Mexico and the Andean Region, Americas Research Group, Foreign and Commonwealth Office - Joined the FCO as a career diplomat in 1987 and has served in a wide variety of roles both overseas and in the UK, including across Asia, Africa and Latin America. Assignments in Latin America included Political Secretary, Buenos Aires (from ’97 to 2001) and Economic and Commercial Director, Caracas (from 2011 to 2015).

Andrés Mejía Acosta is a Senior Lecturer in Political Economy of Emerging Markets at King’s College Department of International Development and director of its Doctoral Program. He has written numerous books and articles looking at the impact of different formal and informal political institutions on the policy process and policy outcomes, particularly in Ecuador and the Andean region.

Attendance is free of charge but registration is required as seating is limited.


Homophobias, Human Rights and Social Change in the French and British Caribbean
Woburn Suite, G22/26, Ground Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
23 March 2017 | 17.30 - 19.30

Speaker: Professor David Murray (York University, Toronto)

The Caribbean region is often characterized as uniformly homophobic and LGBT rights are often claimed by governmental and non-governmental organizations as the conduit through which change can be effected. What happens when we question assumptions about the meaning of homophobia and the effects of imposing this term on dispersed and diverse societies? How might we also constructively question rights as a universal strategy through which to change local laws, beliefs and practices? The goal of this presentation is to critically engage with key concepts in sexual minority discrimination and rights talk occurring in transnational contexts, utilizing ethnographic examples from Barbados and Martinique in order to challenge assumptions of the uniformity and translatability of LGBT rights as a primary response to homophobia in the Caribbean.

Convenor: Willian Tantam, Postdoctoral Fellow (Centre for Integrated Caribbean Research).

This event is free but advanced booking is required. To book your place please use this link: http://sas.sym-online.com/registrationforms/ilasbooking15366/.

For more information about this event, please contact William Tantum (william.tantam@london.ac.uk OR 020 7862 8871).


Researching Gender and Sexualities in the Caribbean and Latin America
Woburn Suite, G22/26, Ground Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
24 March 2017 | 12.00 - 15.00

Speakers:

This event is free but advanced booking is required. To book your place please use this link: http://sas.sym-online.com/registrationforms/ilasbooking1536915373/.

For more information about this event, please contact William Tantum (william.tantam@london.ac.uk OR 020 7862 8871).


A Return to the Village: Community ethnographies and the study of Andean culture in retrospective.
Woburn Suite, G22/26, Ground Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
24 March 2017 | 18.00 - 20.00

The Institute of Latin American Studies (ILAS) invites you for an evening of lively debate and discussion to celebrate the launch of their new publication A Return to the Village.

After an introduction from Professor Linda Newson, the Institute Director, the editor will give an overview of the book. There will be followed by a panel with special guest discussants.

Confirmed speakers include:

A drinks & nibbles reception will follow, and there will be the opportunity to buy the book at an exclusive discounted price.

This event is free but advanced booking is required. To book your place please use this link: http://sas.sym-online.com/registrationforms/ilasbooking17112/.

For more information about this event and any other being held or organised by ILAS, please contact Olga Jimenez (olga.jimenez@sas.ac.uk OR 020 7862 8833).


Conversations about Art in the Andes
Room 234, Second Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
29 March 2017 | 17.30 - 19.30

This event is free but advanced booking is required. To book your place please use this link: http://sas.sym-online.com/registrationforms/ilasbooking16925/.

For more information about this event and any other being held or organised by ILAS, please contact Olga Jimenez (olga.jimenez@sas.ac.uk OR 020 7862 8833).


Birtha Postgraduate Conference “Empires And Nations: Beyond The British Case
Room 3.33, Wills Memorial Building, Queens Rd. BS8 1RJ
25 April 2017

This one-day postgraduate conference aims to provide a friendly and constructive environment for scholarly debate. The conference is open to MA, MPhil and PhD researchers.

The goal of the conference is to bring together postgraduate researchers working on any topic related to the main theme of imperialism, preferably beyond the British case. Due to the logical dominance of the British imperial past within the broader field of Imperial, Colonial, Postcolonial, and Global History studies in the UK, the aim of this conference is precisely to focus on other imperial and postcolonial experiences, European as well as non-European, of the 19th and 20th centuries. By focusing the conference on cases other than the British, we aim to foster debate with a broader and more inclusive approach to the complex imperial pasts and colonial legacies of modern societies. Thus, we strongly encourage the participation of researchers looking at European as well as non-European imperial experiences.

The core issue of discussion will include (though will not be limited to) the interrelation and interaction between Empires and Nations in a broad sense. We therefore welcome papers addressing topics such as nation-building in imperial contexts, the impact of the imperial experience in the shaping of both colonizing and colonized societies, the debate on citizenship and political belonging in imperial scenarios, and the configuration of multinational empires, among other themes.

For further information and if you wish to attend, please contact either Fernando J. Padilla (fp13534@bristol.ac.uk) or Diego Repenning (dr1624@bristol.ac.uk). A programme and registration information will be made available later in March.

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EVENTS

Getting into and understanding Cuba today: a workshop
Canning House
6 March 2017 | 13.30 - 18.00

The Centre for Research on Cuba (University of Nottingham) is pleased to announce this forthcoming workshop, especially designed for political analysts, current or potential investors, financial services companies and law firms:

13.30 Welcome and opening words - HE Teresita Vicente (Ambassador of Cuba to the UK)
13.45 Getting your head around Cuban politics - Prof. Antoni Kapcia (University of Nottingham)
14.30 Tea & coffee break
14.45 Understanding the Cuban economy - Dr Emily Morris (UCL)
15.30 Shifting Sands: The Legalities of Trading with Cuba - Prof. Nigel White (University of Nottingham)
16.15 Questions and answers
17.00 Drinks reception

Registration is available on-line: http://workshop.cubaresearchforum.org This event has a cost of £50 (including tea/coffee and a drinks reception). Canning House corporate members are entitled to attend at no charge.


Book Launch: 'The Last Day of Oppression, and the First Day of the Same: The Politics and Economics of the New Latin American Left' by Jeffery Webber
UCL Institute of the Americas, 51 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PN
8 March 2017 | 18.00 onwards

This talk will explain the political dynamics and conflicts underpinning the contradictory evolution of left-wing governments and social movements in Latin America in the last two decades. Throughout the 2000s, Latin America transformed itself into the leading edge of anti-neoliberal resistance in the world. What is left of the Pink Tide today? What are the governments’ relationships to the explosive social movements that propelled them to power? As China’s demand slackens for Latin American commodities, will they continue to rely on natural resource extraction? This talk is grounded in an analysis of trends in capitalist accumulation from 1990 to 2015, in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador and Venezuela.

It explains inequality there today through a decolonial Marxist framework, rooted in a new understanding of class and its complex associations with racial and gender oppression.

The talk will also cover indigenous and peasant resistance to the expansion of private mining, agro-industry and natural gas and oil activities. Finally, the presentation will conclude with remarks on “passive revolution” in Bolivia under Evo Morales and debates around dual power and class composition during the era of Hugo Chavez in Venezuela.

Jeffery R. Webber is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary University of London. He is the author of The Last Day of Oppression, and the First Day of the Same, Red October: Left-Indigenous Struggles in Modern Bolivia, and From Rebellion to Reform in Bolivia: Class Struggle, Indigenous Liberation, and the Politics of Evo Morales.

This event is free of charge but registration is required, as seating is limited.

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CALL FOR PAPERS

VI Congreso Mitos Prehispánicos en la Literatura Latinoamericana
Mitos prehispánicos y mitos clásicos en la Literatura Latinoamericana
Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma
20-22 de Septiembre de 2017

DEADLINE 31 March 2017

El Congreso que se celebrará en Roma en Septiembre de 2017 será el sexto Congreso organizado por el Grupo de Investigación "Mitos Prehispánicos en la Literatura Latinoamericana", creado en la Universidad Autònoma de Barcelona en 2005 que reúne ya a muchos investigadores de numerosas instituciones europeas y americanas. Después de los congresos de Barcelona, Liverpool, Alicante, Lima y Morelia, el que se organizará en Roma quiere ampliar el campo de investigación incluyendo las relaciones, amplias y fecundas, que la literatura latinoamericana ha tenido con la mitología clásica. En los congresos anteriores se han ido investigando, desde perspectivas diferentes, las presencias de los mitos prehispánicos en las producciones literarias escritas y orales, de origen autóctono y nacidas del cruce transcultural con las culturas europeas y africanas, dibujando un mapa que ha mostrado un enorme riqueza de resultados. En este congreso la ampliación de la mirada permitirá investigar còmo las reescrituras de los mitos clásicos, llegados a América con los colonizadores europeos, dieron lugar –y lo siguen haciendo– a contaminaciones creativas entre mitos y creencias de los dos lados del Atlántico, multiplicando a desmesura significados y sugestiones de la mitología de origen greco-romano.

El Congreso se realizará en colaboración con el Departamento de Estudios Europeos, Americanos e Interculturales de Sapienza – Universidad de Roma, de la Revista "Mitologías Hoy" de la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona y de AISI, Asociación Italiana de Estudios Iberoamericanos.

El Congreso se desarrollará a través de una serie de Conferencias Plenarias y de Mesas Temáticas simultáneas alrededor de los siguientes temas:

  1. Perspectivas teóricas sobre mitos, rituales, su transmisión y reescrituras en la creación literaria latinoamericana
  2. Procesos históricos y mitologización de la historia: horizontes culturales de las identidades
  3. Mitos y pseudomitos en la narrativa indianista, indigenista e indìgena
  4. Geografías míticas y prehispánicas y narrativa contemporánea
  5. La diáspora africana y su presencia en la literatura latinoamericana contemporánea
  6. Mitología y construcción de la modernidad: conflictos y convergencias
  7. Literaturas locales y regionales y mitologías indígenas: fronteras, espacios liminales e imaginarios
  8. Literaturas contemporáneas en lenguas autóctonas y perspectivas del mito
  9. Etnografías, mitos y literaturas
  10. Poesía y mitos prehispánicos
  11. Las artes (artes figurativas, cine, música y otras formas artìsticas) y la herencia prehispánicas
  12. Mitología clásica en Latinoamerica: reescrituras narrativas y perspectivas transculturales
  13. Mitologías prehispánicas y mitología clásica: contaminaciones y reescrituras
  14. Traducciones de mitos clásicos en lenguas autoctonas: perspectivas de estudio
  15. Mitos clásicos y poesía latinoamericana
  16. Mitos clásicos en las artes: artes figurativas, cine, música y otras formas artisticas.

Resúmenes y comunicaciones
Las propuestas de comunicaciones pueden enviarse a la dirección mitosroma2017@gmail.com hasta el 31 de marzo de 2017 y deben incluir el título, el resumen (con una extensión máxima de 2000 caracteres), el nombre, la afiliación institucional, la dirección electrónica y un breve curriculum académico. Se aceptan propuestas de comunicaciones en lengua española, portuguesa, italiana e inglesa.

La extensión de la comunicación no deberá exceder los 20 minutos de lectura. El Comité Organizador, una vez leídos los resumenes, comunicará su aceptación por medio de correo electrónico.

Se aceptan también propuestas de Mesas Temáticas, con un máximo de cinco participantes, preferentemente de diferentes Universidades.

Inscripción
Una vez aceptada la propuesta de comunicación deberá formalizarse la inscripción abonando (hasta el 30 de abril), la cuota correspondiente según las siguientes indicaciones:

El pago se podrá efectuar en la cuenta corriente que será indicada en el mes de abril.

Sede y Alojamiento
El congreso se desarrollará en la nueva sede de Sapienza, Università di Roma, situada en Viale dello Scalo di San Lorenzo, en el barrio de San Lorenzo.

Para el alojamiento señalamos los hoteles siguientes:

Todas las informaciones sobre el Congreso se encontrarán en la página:

https://congresomitosroma2017.wordpress.com
https://www.facebook.com/mitosroma2017/


Comisión Nacional de Conmemoración del Centenario Augusto Roa Bastos
Asunción, Paraguay
6 al 8 de Junio 2017

DEADLINE 15 May 2017
 
La Comisión Nacional de Conmemoración del Centenario de Augusto Roa Bastos, la Aso­ciación de Historiadores de América Latina y el Caribe (ADHILAC), la Academia Paraguaya de la Lengua Española, la Academia Paraguaya de la Historia, la Academia de Lengua Guaraní, la Organización de Estados Iberoamericanos y la Multisectorial del libro, integrada por múltiples organizaciónes culturales del Paraguay, convocan al

Congreso Internacional de Literatura: “Roa Entre la Historia y la Literatura”

Este Congreso Internacional de Literatura objetivo de reunir a escritores e intelectuales de diferentes partes del mundo para estudiar la obra multifacética del narrador, poeta, ensayista, guionista de cine, periodista, conferencista, catedrático y eterno luchador por la democracia y la defensa de los Derechos Humanos.

Este congreso Internacional forma parte de las múltiples actividades que realiza la Comisión Nacional de Conmemoración del Centenario de Augusto Roa Bastos durante todo el año 2017 para honrar al insigne paraguayo, considerado como el mayor escritor de este país y uno de los grandes de la literatura del siglo XX en toda nuestra América, ganador del Premio Cervantes en 1989, con una prolífica obra traducida a más 25 lenguas.

Para este fin se establecen los siguientes ejes y mesas de trabajo, donde recibirán las ponen­cias para su análisis y aceptación.

Temas Propuestos:

Plazos y Requerimientos

La recepción de las ponencias estará abierta partir del 20 de febrero hasta el 15 de mayo de 2017. El correo electrónico habilitado es: congresoroabastos@gmail.com.

Las mismas deben contener:

Cada ponente dispondrá de 20 minutos para hacer su presentación en la fecha y hora asigna­da por el comité central del Congreso.

Metodología

El Congreso se realizará con la modalidad de mesas temáticas con ponencias individuales, seguidas de una sesión de preguntas y comentarios de cada una. También se realizarán confe­rencias centrales a cargo de conferencistas invitados.

Participación

Los interesados, también podrán proponer mesas temáticas o enviar ponencias individuales. Las mesas temáticas deberán contar con un mínimo de tres ponencias y un máximo de cinco, y los resúmenes serán evaluados individualmente.

Para participar como ponente en el evento los interesados deben enviar una propuesta de ponencia en idioma español a las siguientes direcciones de correo electrónico: congresoroabastos@gmail.com

La propuesta debe contener la siguiente información:

Las cartas de aceptación de ponencias serán enviadas por los coordinadores del evento hasta el 20 de mayo de 2015 y la programación definitiva saldrá el 25 de mayo de 2017.

Correo institucional, Facebook, Coordinadores institucionales
Fernando Griffith, Ministro de Cultura
Margarita Morselli, directora del Centro Cultural “Cabildo”
Dr. Sergio Guerra, Presidente ADHILAC

Coordinación General
Sra. Margarita Morselli

Coordinación Académica
Dr. Víctor-jacinto Flecha, Dra. Mary Monte de López Moreira, Lic. Ana Martini
 
La vida de Augusto José Antonio Roa Bastos estuvo muy entrelazada a los avatares de su patria, terriblemente enfrentada entre los buscadores de la libertad y los que la enterraban. Esta dimensión de tragedia que traspasa enteramente la historia contemporánea paraguaya signó la vida y la obra de Augusto. Nació en 1917, cuando la patria iba recuperándose, de alguna forma, de la inmolación que le significó la Guerra de exterminio de la Triple Alianza (1864-1870) en el que casi desapareció el país. Otra guerra internacional la del Chaco (1932-1935) en que se enfrentaron dos pueblos hermanos, Paraguay y Bolivia, la vivió de cerca participando de en ella, siendo todavía un adolescente. Estos acontecimientos imprimirían en su personalidad y afloran en su obra. Como periodista.

Avenida República y Alberd, Asunción, Paraguay
Cel. +595971 304544
E-Mail: congresoroabastos@gmail.com
Asunción del Paragu


Digital Imaginaries of the South: Stories of Belonging and Uprooting in Hispanic Cinemas
Universidad Carlos III de Madrid / Casa de América (Madrid)
18-20 October 2017

DEADLINE 28 May 2017

International Film Conference (IV TECMERIN Academic Meeting)

Over the past twenty years, digital technology has become the standard in the film production, circulation, and consumption processes. Within this context, Hispanic cinemas have undergone deep changes, both within the countries with an established cinematic tradition, as well as in those that, due to several reasons, had not developed a robust cinematography throughout the 20th century. The analogue paradigm became deeply contested and a new digital framework, which was widely discussed by institutions, film critics, and academics, emerged. This moment coincides with the widespread generalization of national and transnational neoliberal policies that, far from backing diversity, have increased the gap between those “connected” and those “disconnected” (to draw upon Néstor García Canclini’s term); a gap also experienced by those that, even if connected, still occupy subaltern positions.

The speeding of these processes has resulted in an increase of mobility, at work both in the geographical displacement of film professionals and in the emergence of new narratives models that deal with questions of belonging and uprooting, springing precisely from these experiences of displacement. The cinemas of the Global South, and, most specifically, Hispanic cinemas, have actively taken part in these processes, ultimately playing a relevant role in terms of narrative and aesthetic models, and the production, circulation and consumption of film.

Following the main research axes of the R+D project “Transnational relations in Hispanic digital cinemas: the axes of Spain, Mexico, and Argentina” (CSO2014-52750- P), the International Conference Digital Imaginaries of the South: Stories of Belonging and Uprooting in Hispanic Cinemas welcomes proposals across the following lines of inquiry:

Presentations should be no longer than 20 minutes and may be in Spanish, Portuguese or English. Those interested in participating in the conference should send a title and an abstract proposal of 250 words to info.atcinema@hum.uc3m.es, before May 28th, 2017. Please send the abstract as an attachment to your e-mail. The file must include the title, name of the presenter (and co-presenters if any), institutional affiliation, and e- mail. Proposals for panels (4 papers or 3 presentations plus respondent) are welcome and must include a title for the panel itself and the different papers, the names of the participants and a brief summary of both the panel and the individual proposals.

For more information you can check our website: http://www.uc3m.es/atcinema/congreso


British Society for Population Studies Annual Conference 2017
University of Liverpool
6 - 8 September 2017

DEADLINE 24 April 2017 (midnight)

http://www.lse.ac.uk/socialPolicy/Researchcentresandgroups/BSPS/annualConference/Home.aspx

Strand on Latin America and the Caribbean
Strand organisers: Ludi Simpson (University of Manchester); Tiziana Leone (London School of Economics).
Any aspect of population studies in the continent. Papers with analytic results comparing more than one country will be favoured.
Email contact: ludi.simpson@manchester.ac.uk T.Leone@lse.ac.uk

The 2017 BSPS Conference will be held at the University of Liverpool, 6-8 September. All Conference sessions will be on site, where Conference catering & high-standard accommodation will also be available. Booking forms will be available from May, together with a provisional timetable.

A short abstract of up to 250 words is required, which should cover research question, methods, data, preliminary results & potential applications. There will be a full programme of simultaneous strand sessions of submitted papers: proposals and abstracts for papers & posters are invited across the entire demographic & population studies spectrum. (Submissions should have a demographic or population studies focus.) Ongoing work with incomplete analyses & findings should be submitted as posters: submissions for oral presentation should include results.


Traversing Cultures, Languages and Space
York St John University and University of Hull
7-8 September 2017

DEADLINE 1 June 2017

In a climate dominated by the resurgence of nationalism and the proliferation of populist discourses it is extremely important to keep the debates on transnationalism and multiculturalism open. This will help dispel the fear of the other that is at the core of the aforementioned phenomena and ultimately contribute to the creation of more inclusive societies.

This interdisciplinary conference is designed to address the above challenge. It aims to explore the relationship between space and culture, focusing in particular on the circulation of ideas and the interaction of different cultural forms in a globalized world. This conference will add to recent debates on transnationalism and multiculturalism. More precisely, the conference addresses the relationship between space, culture, identity and power from the intersection of language studies (including English and Anglophone studies), cultural studies, cultural geography, political studies, and area studies. The following principal themes frame the academic debate envisioned for this event:

The conference will build upon the existing expertise in the above themes and invite cross-disciplinary and interdisciplinary engagement with the themes, which are reflective of the current contribution by the Arts and Humanities researchers (including scholars of Modern Languages) to tackling global challenges and helping build cohesive communities in the face of the changing global cultural landscape.

The conference will be held on 7-8 September 2017 at York St John University (7 September) and University of Hull (8 September).

The conference will be of interest to the representatives of multiple disciplines and the publications to follow will include the best contributions. The conference will present an opportunity for networking and establishing connections across disciplines to undertake more in-depth investigation into individual themes. Following the contribution from the keynote speakers (described above in Section 6), the two respondents will open up interdisciplinary possibilities between Modern Languages and, respectively, English Studies broadly understood as well as Cultural Geography.

There are plans to produce two types of publications. First, a collected volume (co-edited by the conference organisers) will be published on the theme of global spaces and identities. Secondly, several special issues with area-specific perspectives on the themes covered by the conference can be proposed by guest editors to high ranking academic journals in relevant fields.

To submit a presentation, please send a short abstract in English (250-300 words), along with a biographical note (100 words) to Dr Victoria Carpenter (v.carpenter@yorksj.ac.uk). The deadline for abstract submissions is 1 June 2017. The presenters will be notified of the outcome by 20 June 2017.


LALSA Annual Conference 'Latin American Literature: Past, Present and Future'
York St John University
16-17 November 2017

DEADLINE 15 September 2017

Papers are invited for the LALSA Annual Conference. This year, the theme of the conference is ‘Re-reading’. Comparative and cross-disciplinary readings of Latin American literary texts are particularly welcome. The conference welcomes contributions from the scholars and students of Latin American literature. Any approach to well known or lesser known texts is appreciated; any cross-disciplinary stance is encouraged.

Abstracts (250-350 words) can be in English or Spanish. Presentations will be 20 minutes long. Please e-mail your abstract to v.carpenter@yorksj.ac.uk. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 15 September 2017. We will let you know if your abstract has been accepted by 1 October 2017.

Please join us and enjoy the company of like-minded scholars of Latin American literature!

IMPORTANT: To submit an abstract, you must be a LALSA member. Please contact Victoria Carpenter (v.carpenter@yorksj.ac.uk) to join. There is an annual membership fee, to be paid with the conference registration.

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BOOKS

Picturing the Proletariat: Artists and Labor in Revolutionary Mexico, 1908–1940
by John Lear
University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9781477311509
£25.99: 20% discount with code - CSL217PICT

http://www.combinedacademic.co.uk/picturing-the-proletariat-content

In the wake of Mexico’s revolution, artists played a fundamental role in constructing a national identity centered on working people and were hailed for their contributions to modern art. Picturing the Proletariat examines three aspects of this artistic legacy: the parallel paths of organized labor and artists’ collectives, the relations among these groups and the state, and visual narratives of the worker. Showcasing forgotten works and neglected media, John Lear explores how artists and labor unions participated in a cycle of revolutionary transformation from 1908 through the presidency of Lázaro Cárdenas (1934–1940). Lear shows how middle-class artists, radicalized by the revolution and the Communist Party, fortified the legacy of the prerevolutionary print artisan José Guadalupe Posada by incorporating modernist, avant-garde, and nationalist elements in ways that supported and challenged unions and the state. By 1940, the state undermined the autonomy of radical artists and unions, while preserving the image of both as partners of the “institutionalized revolution.”

This interdisciplinary book explores the gendered representations of workers; the interplay of prints, photographs, and murals in journals, in posters, and on walls; the role of labor leaders; and the discursive impact of the Spanish Civil War. It considers “los tres grandes” - Rivera, Siquieros, and Orozco - while featuring lesser-known artists and their collectives, including Saturnino Herrán, Leopoldo Méndez, Santos Balmori, and the League of Revolutionary Writers and Artists (LEAR). The result is a new perspective on the art and politics of the revolution.

John Lear is a professor of history and Latin American studies at the University of Puget Sound. His publications include Workers, Neighbors and Citizens: The Revolution in Mexico City and Chile’s Free Market Miracle: A Second Look.

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MAGAZINES / NEWSLETTERS / WEBSITES

LSE Latin America and Caribbean blog
http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/latamcaribbean

The LSE Latin America and Caribbean blog was recently launched with posts from former Mexican president Carlos Salinas de Gortari (on why Trump must not dismantle NAFTA), Dr Emily Morris (on the economic impact of a reversal of US-Cuba rapprochement), and former head of the Argentine statistical agency INDEC Norberto Itzcovich (on the relationship between politics and public numbers).

The blog aims to use expert, evidence-based analysis to increase awareness and understanding of Latin America and the Caribbean, both as a region and as individual states and territories. We are particularly keen to publish contributions that approach the region on its own terms rather than interpreting it through the lens of events, processes, and interests elsewhere.

Our thematic coverage is broad and multidisciplinary, encompassing all aspects of governance, economics, international affairs, politics, culture, and society. Our geographic coverage extends from Mexico and Bermuda in the north to Tierra del Fuego in the south, including all of the independent states and overseas dependencies in-between, as well as their diasporas. We have no editorial "line" beyond our commitment to communicating social-science research and commentary in ways that enhance public debate and understanding. Blogs are published predominantly in English, but we also offer numerous posts in Spanish.

We encourage the submission of well-argued, evidence-based contributions (usually PhD-level upwards) that can improve public debate on issues involving and affecting the region and its peoples. For further information or details of how to submit a blog article, please email laccblog@lse.ac.uk.

You can also hear about our posts via Facebook and Twitter:
http://facebook.com/LSELACC
http://twitter.com/LSE_LACC

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STUDENT FUNDING

Postgraduate Research Funding UK & EU Students
Open University - Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Full Time & Part Time, £14,057
Ref: 10237/RD/SS/1701

DEADLINE 16 March 2017 (17.00 GMT)

The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences invites applications for full-time PhD studentships (three years) and full-time (three years) or part-time (six years) PhD fee waivers, commencing October 2017.

The Faculty has a thriving research culture and is engaged in world-class, critical and agenda setting research that has a strong focus on social justice, impact and public engagement.  We are committed to the enhancement and development of this culture as a priority in our mission. To this end, we welcome applications that can be supervised within, or across the following disciplines within the Faculty: Development Policy and Practice; Economics; Geography; Politics and International Studies; Psychology; Social Policy and Criminology; Sociology. Note that studentships in Arts disciplines within the Faculty were previously advertised and the closing date for these has now passed.

Further details of our PhD programmes and information on how to apply can be found at: http://www.open.ac.uk/socialsciences/research/students/index.php

Applicants should have at least a 2:1 as a first degree, a relevant master’s degree and be interested in conducting research at a doctorate level in one of the following areas:

Development Policy and Practice, including:civil society, NGOs and social movements; health systems and development; Inclusive innovation and development; migration, transnationalism and development; 'Rising Powers' and Africa; states, political systems and developments, especially in Africa and Latin America

Economics, including: health economics; welfare economics; behavioural economics; personal finance; economics and development; economics of innovation; Post-Keynesian economics; economics of households

Geography, including: agriculture and food; culture and climate change; digital technologies and cities; geographies of migration, money and finance, religion and spirituality, sound; politics of consumption; resilience and social-ecological systems; visual culture, place and identity

Politics and International Studies, including: British and comparative politics; citizenship studies; democracy and social movements; international relationship and global politics; political ideas

Psychology, including: applied cognition; counselling and psychotherapy; critical, narrative, discursive and psychosocial research; forensic psychology

Social Policy and Criminology, including: policing and regulation; prisons and incarceration; social harm and crimes of the powerful; processes of criminalisation and social inequalities; institutionalised racism in the criminal justice system; violence and abuse; critical social policy

Sociology, including: Digital cultures, social networks and political change; digital, material and everyday participation, transformations and infrastructures; markets, consumption and cultural economy; migration, gender and generation; multicultural life, citizenship, difference, political conflict and social divisions; psychoanalytic sociology and the psychosocial; sociology of heath and medicine

Please see Job Related Information [PDF] for more information on research areas, supervision and research environment within the Faculty.

Applicants must normally reside in the UK for the duration of the studentship.

For pre-submission enquiries, prospective applicants may write to Dr Agnes Czajka, Director of Research Degrees, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS-PhD-Applications@open.ac.uk).

Completed application forms, together with a Research Proposal and a covering letter indicating your suitability and reasons for applying must be sent to FASS-PhD-Applications@open.ac.uk

Application forms are available from http://www.open.ac.uk/postgraduate/research-degrees/how-to-apply.

Closing date:  16 March 2017 at 5pm

Equality Opportunity is University policy.

JOBS

Lecturer in Latin American Studies
University of Kent, Canterbury
Permanent, Full Time, £32,958 - £46,924
Ref: HUM0760

DEADLINE 26 Mar 2017

This opportunity in the Department of Modern Languages in the School of European Culture and Languages at Kent will suit a lecturer with expertise in any field of Latin American literature and culture.

You will be able to demonstrate an outstanding research profile commensurate with your career stage and the ability to teach on a range of modules in the Department’s Hispanic Studies programmes, including both cultural content modules and Spanish language modules. We particularly welcome applications from candidates whose expertise also extends to the ability to teach Portuguese language modules.

In this role, you will be expected to develop new modules in your area of expertise, and to be an enthusiastic and inspiring teacher. Moreover, you will be able to contribute to the Department’s increasing ambition and international standing in terms of high-quality research (Modern Languages and Linguistics at Kent being one of the highest-ranked departments in the UK at REF2014), and to be a dynamic colleague capable of working effectively as part of a team. A commitment to public engagement and impact activities would be an advantage.

The School of European Culture and Languages is a multidisciplinary school and one of the largest at the University of Kent. Comprising six departments, the School embraces Classical and Archaeological Studies (including Ancient History), Comparative Literature, English Language and Linguistics, the Modern Languages (French, German, Hispanic Studies, and Italian), Philosophy, and Religious Studies, as well as programmes in Asian Studies and World Literature.

Established in 1965, the University of Kent – the UK’s European university – now has almost 20,000 students across campuses or study centres at Canterbury, Medway, Tonbridge, Brussels, Paris, Athens and Rome. It has been ranked: 23rd in The Guardian University Guide 2017; 23rd in The Complete University Guide 2017 and 23rd in The Times and Sunday Times University Guide 2016. Kent is ranked 17th in the UK for research intensity (REF 2014). It has world-leading research in all subjects and 97% of its research is deemed by the REF to be of international quality.

Further Information

Interviews are to be held: 19 April 2017

Please see the links below to view the full job description and also to apply for this post. If you require further information regarding the application process please contact Michelle McCartney, Resourcing Adviser, at M.J.McCartney@kent.ac.uk. Any informal inquiries can be directed to Nuria Triana Toribio, mnt@kent.ac.uk.

Please note: applications must be made via the University’s online application system. You will be required to fill in the main details section of the application form as well as upload your CV and a cover letter. Your cover letter should clearly and explicitly address the requirements of the Person specification and you should provide clear evidence and examples in your application which back-up any assertions you make in relation to each criterion. We recommend a maximum of 4 x A4 sides for this document.

CVs or details sent directly to the department or via email cannot be considered. If you are invited for an interview, we will request references for you at that stage.

Full Job Description

HUM0760 Additional Information.docx
HUM0760 Additional Information.pdf
HUM0760 Job Description.docx
HUM0760 Job Description.pdf

Applying

Click here to apply for this job


Lecturer in Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies
University College Cork, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies
Permanent, Full Time, £27,044.67 to £65,393 p.a.

DEADLINE 28 March 2017

UCC wishes to appoint a Lecturer in Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies. We welcome applications from candidates with expertise in any area of Hispanic Studies, and are keen to appoint a candidate who complements existing coverage within the Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies. Candidates with the ability to combine teaching and/or research expertise in Hispanic and Lusophone Studies, which is of particular interest to the strategic needs of the Department and the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, will also be welcome. The successful applicant will be expected to contribute to the undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the Department, as well as to one or more of the taught MA programmes offered in the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, in particular the MA in Translation Studies.

Applicants must hold a PhD before taking up the position and must have native or near-native command of Spanish. Evidence of a commitment to excellence and innovation in both teaching and research is required. A strong contribution to the research culture of both the Department and the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures will also be expected. The successful candidate will be required to participate as appropriate in the normal administrative work of the Department and the School.

The Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies at UCC is a vibrant centre of teaching and research across a broad range of areas, including modern and contemporary Spain, Latin America, as well as courses in the languages and cultures of Portugal, Catalonia, Galicia and the Basque Country. It has two active research centres – the Centre for Mexican Studies and the Irish Centre for Galician Studies – and offers courses at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels.We are now looking for a highly qualified and motivated lecturer to take up a permanent lectureship from September 2017. 

Please note that Garda vetting and/or an international police clearance check may form part of the selection process.

For an information package including full details of the post, selection criteria and application process see www.ucc.ie/hr/vacancies. The University, at its discretion, may undertake to make an additional appointment(s) from this competition following the conclusion of the process.

Appointment may be made on the Lectureship Salary Scale: €31,821 - €56,967/€62,353 - €76,942

In all instances the successful appointment will be at the first point of the scale.

Informal enquiries may be made to Head of Department, Dr Helena Buffery; Email: h.buffery@ucc.ie; Tel. +353 21 4902553

Candidates should apply, in confidence, before 5pm on Tuesday 28th March 2017 by emailing a completed application form to recruitment@ucc.ie

CVs and handwritten forms will not be accepted.

No late applications will be accepted.

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CORK IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES EMPLOYER

Please note than an appointment to posts advertised will be dependent on University approval, together with the terms of the employment control framework for the higher education sector


University Lecturer in Caribbean and Atlantic History since c.1500
University of Cambridge - Faculty of History
Permanent, Full Time, £39,324 to £49,772
Ref: JJ11269

DEADLINE 29 March 2017

The Faculty of History is seeking to appoint a University Lecturer in Caribbean and Atlantic History in any period since c.1500. Candidates must have exceptional abilities in research and teaching.  The post is based in central Cambridge and is available from 1 October 2017 or as soon as possible thereafter.

The successful candidate will have an outstanding and developing research profile in early or late modern Caribbean and Atlantic history. The ability to teach in the history of Latin America and south Atlantic history over a wide temporal and geographical range will be an advantage. The incumbent must:  have excellent communication, interpersonal, and organisational skills; show a commitment to supporting students academically; and be able and ready to co-operate in Faculty affairs, including undertaking administration.

The appointee will be responsible for teaching Caribbean history as well as contributing to general World history teaching, at all levels from first-year undergraduate to PhD. She or he will be expected to offer a taught course to the MPhil in World History and to supervise undergraduate and postgraduate dissertations. In due course, the appointee will be expected to design and teach a Part II Specified or Special Subject paper on a Caribbean or Atlantic topic, and to play a part in convening Part I papers and directing the MPhil in World History.

The Faculty welcomes applications from both early-career scholars and those who already have established careers. By the start of the appointment, the successful candidate must hold a doctorate (or equivalent) in a relevant field.

Please see the Further Particulars for this post.

To apply online for this vacancy and to view further information about the role, please visit: http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/12717. This will take you to the role on the University’s Job Opportunities pages. There you will need to click on the 'Apply online' button and register an account with the University's Web Recruitment System (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Applicants seeking further information about the post are invited to contact Dr Lawrence Klein, Chair of the Faculty of History: histchm@hermes.cam.ac.uk. For further details about the application process, please contact the Faculty's HR Clerk, Ms Joanne Pearson (e-mail: jobs@hist.cam.ac.uk, telephone: 01223 335350).

Please quote reference JJ11269 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity. The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.


Senior Lecturer/Reader in Development Economics
King's College London - Department of International Development
Permanent, Full Time, £49,772 to £63,018
Ref: A8R/DAR/0418/17-TC

DEADLINE 31 March 2017

The Department of International Development is seeking outstanding candidates for a Senior Lecturer/Reader in Development Economics. The successful applicant will be an applied economist whose research focuses on the broad area of economic development or emerging economies. Within this rubric there is no restriction regarding the specific field of research.

The appointee will join an interdisciplinary team currently working on a wide range of topics including political economy of development, inclusive growth, inequality and poverty, gender rights, natural resources, international trade, migration, health policy, education, and other pressing issues facing emerging economies today.

DID is a young, innovative and contemporary development studies department. Our focus is on the middle-income developing countries or ‘emerging economies’, meaning the fast growing economies of the developing world where foreign aid is largely irrelevant. The mission is to explore the sources of success as well as understand the major development challenges they continue to face. The approach taken is one of studying context and actual economic, social and political change in middle-income countries rather than prescriptive models of development. The institute has regional expertise on Latin America, Asia and Africa but any regional focus within the ‘emerging’ world is welcome.

The selection process will include a presentation and a panel interview. Interviews are scheduled to be held in May 2017.

For an informal discussion to find out more about the role please contact Professor Susan Fairley Murray on susan_fairley.murray@kcl.ac.uk or 0207 848 7581.

To apply for this role, please go to the King’s College London HireWire Job Board and register to download and submit the specified application form.

The deadline for applications is midnight on 31 March 2017.


Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in the Sociology/Social Anthropology of Development
King's College London - Department of International Development
Permanent, Full Time, £32,958 to £57,674 p.a.
Ref: A68/DBI/0419/17-TC

DEADLINE 2 April 2017

The Department of International Development is seeking outstanding candidates for a Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in the Sociology or Social Anthropology of Development. The successful applicant will be a sociologist / social anthropologist whose research focuses either in ‘emerging economies’ or on the study of global institutions and networks. For this post we welcome applicants who have expertise in at least one of the following: transnational networks and/or social mobilization; social justice issues; labour relations and/or labour organization; qualitative research methodology.

The appointee will join an interdisciplinary team currently working on a wide range of topics including political economy of development, inclusive growth, inequality and poverty, gender rights, natural resources, international trade, migration, health policy, education, and other pressing issues facing emerging economies today.

DID is a young, innovative and contemporary development studies department. Our focus is on middle-income developing countries or ‘emerging economies’, meaning the fast growing economies of the developing world where foreign aid is largely irrelevant. The mission is to explore the sources of success as well as understand the major development challenges they continue to face. The approach taken is one of studying context and actual economic, social and political change in middle-income countries rather than prescriptive models of development. The institute has regional expertise on Latin America, Asia and Africa but any regional focus within the ‘emerging’ world is welcome.

The selection process will include a presentation and a panel interview. Interviews are scheduled to be held in May 2017. For an informal discussion to find out more about the role please contact Professor Susan Fairley Murray on susan_fairley.murray@kcl.ac.uk or 0207 848 7581.

To apply for this role, please go to the King’s College London HireWire Job Board and register to download and submit the specified application form.

The deadline for applications is midnight on 2 April 2017.


Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Development Economics
King's College London - Department of International Development
Permanent, Full Time, £32,958 to £48,327 plus £2,623 London Weighting Allowance per annum, depending on experience
Ref: A68/DBI/0420/17-TC

DEADLINE 3 April 2017

The Department of International Development is seeking outstanding candidates for a lecturer/senior lecturer in Development Economics. The successful applicant will be an applied economist whose research focuses on the broad area of economic development or emerging economies. Within this rubric there is no restriction regarding the specific field of research.

The appointee will join an interdisciplinary team currently working on a wide range of topics including political economy of development, inclusive growth, inequality and poverty, gender rights, natural resources, international trade, migration, health policy, education, and other pressing issues facing emerging economies today.

DID is a young, innovative and contemporary development studies department. Our focus is on the middle-income developing countries or ‘emerging economies’, meaning the fast growing economies of the developing world where foreign aid is largely irrelevant. The mission is to explore the sources of success as well as understand the major development challenges they continue to face. The approach taken is one of studying context and actual economic, social and political change in middle-income countries rather than prescriptive models of development. The institute has regional expertise on Latin America, Asia and Africa but any regional focus within the ‘emerging’ world is welcome.

The selection process will include a presentation and a panel interview. Interviews are scheduled to be held in May 2017. For an informal discussion to find out more about the role please contact Professor Susan Fairley Murray on susan_fairley.murray@kcl.ac.uk or 0207 848 7581.

To apply for this role, please go to the King’s College London HireWire Job Board and register to download and submit the specified application form.

The deadline for applications is midnight on 31 March 2017.


Research Fellow
University of Surrey - School of English and Languages
Contract / Temporary, Full Time, £32,004
Ref: 015817

DEADLINE 24 April 2017

The School of English and Languages is seeking to appoint a Postdoctoral Research Fellow for a 9 month period – the first stage of a two-year Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project “Precarious Publishing in Latin America: Relations, Communities and Meanings in Movement” (grant number AH/P005675/1). The project investigators are Lucy Bell (University of Surrey) and Alex Flynn (University of Durham). The position is available from 01 October 2017.

The Project

The project involves the study of editoriales cartoneras (translated as “waste-picking publishers” or “cardboard publishers”) in Mexico and Brazil. The researchers will examine cartoneras from literary and anthropological angles, with the aim of providing a better understanding of how new relations, communities and meanings are created by the transformation of recycled cardboard into low-cost books. This project thus offers the opportunity to carry out transnational, multi-disciplinary research on a fascinating, emerging socio-cultural phenomenon.

Job Description

The successful candidate will provide a strong contribution to the research, delivery and public engagement work of the ‘Precarious publishing in Latin America’ project. The principal role of the Research Fellow will be to conduct ethnographic fieldwork in Mexico, and to publish their findings in collaboration with the PI and Co-I. They will be responsible for research planning and implementation as well as all aspects of data analysis. They will work both independently and collaboratively at postdoctoral level.

Person Specification

We are seeking a high-quality Research Fellow at an early stage of their career, with a specialisation in social anthropology applied to Latin America and an interest in interdisciplinary methods. The successful candidate must have experience of ethnographic fieldwork in Latin America, and be willing to engage in fieldwork in Mexico. The research requires excellent communication skills in Spanish and a proven ability to publish in English language academic journals. A background in one or more of the following areas is desirable: Latin American studies; anthropology of art; social movement studies; urban studies; cultural theory. Candidates must have the ability to work independently while functioning as part of a research team.

Main Responsibilities

The duties of the successful applicant will be set through consultation between the grant-holders and the post-holder. Responsibilities can be expected to range across the following categories:

  1. Conduct high-quality research, independently and in collaboration with colleagues from other disciplines, within the framework of the AHRC-funded project “Precarious Publishing in Latin America: Relations, Communities and Meanings in Movement”.
  2. Sustain research-related contributions through publication, conference presentations, professional and public engagement, co-authoring at least one article on cartonera publishing.
  3. Undertake administrative responsibilities on the programme, including ethnographic research design and conduct, communication and knowledge exchange with key stakeholders and other team members.
  4. Conduct a 6-month period of fieldwork in Mexico in key locations to be discussed with the project team.
  5. Engage in the project’s impact strategy plan, including the building of cartonera collections with the project partners at the British Library, Senate House Library and Cambridge University Library.

Information about the project investigators is available at here and here.

Applications should be submitted using the online form at the application website listed below. Informal enquiries may be made to Dr Lucy Bell or Dr Alex Flynn at the contact information below.

Applying
Pleaes use this link: https://jobs.surrey.ac.uk/Vacancy.aspx?id=3457&forced=1

Contact Information:

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