News

If you would like to contribute an item to the SLAS News page, please email Christy Palmer (editor) on christy_palmer@mac.com providing a short explanation of the event or item, details and any relevant weblinks or attachments.

NOTICE BOARD | CALL FOR PAPERS | CONFERENCES & SEMINARS | EVENTS | PUBLICATIONS | LEARNING | FUNDING | JOBS

Last Updated : 17 March 2019

Notice Board

NEW

The Forum Prize 2019
Literature and Childhood

DEADLINE 26 April 2019

In a world where daily experience is increasingly shaped by interaction with technology, mobility and migration, and environmental anxiety, the ways in which we view and conceptualize the world of childhood have shifted in response to these changed realities. Yet although childhood, depending on the cultural context, is becoming variously burdened with this century’s tech-savvy consumerism, with a sense of environmental crisis and with the effects of conflict and migration, there are still many continuities with the childhood imagining and narratives of former generations. The editors of Forum for Modern Language Studies invite submissions dealing with any topic pertaining to the theme of Literature and Childhood, within the broad field of FMLS’s normal remit (literature and culture in the languages covered by the journal). Topics may include, but are not confined to:

Submissions may address relevant aspects of the language, literature and culture of any of the subject areas covered by the journal: Arabic, English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish and Russian. The competition is open to all researchers, whether established or early career. Previous competitions have been won by scholars in both categories.

The winner will receive:

  1. Publication of the winning essay in the next appropriate volume of Forum for Modern Language Studies, and
  2. A prize of £500

A panel of judges will read all entries, which will be assessed anonymously. At the judges’ discretion, a runner-up prize of £200 may be awarded. The Editors may commission for publication in Forum for Modern Language Studies any entries that are highly commended by the judges.

Entry requirements and Submission details for The Forum Prize 2019


NEW

Blog Round-Up
Latin American & Caribbean Centre
LSE


NEW

Call for Session Organizers
International Sociological Association’s Forum of Sociology

Porto Alegre, Brazil
July 2020

DEADLINE 15 March 2019

The International Sociological Association’s next Forum of Sociology will be held in Porto Alegre, Brazil from July 14-18, 2020. The Economy and Society Research Committee (ISA RC02) is issuing an open call for proposals to organize sessions on topics related to economy and society. The online session proposal submission system is open from 4 February through 15 March 2019, 24:00 GMT. Please note that the deadline is set by ISA and is inflexible. To submit a proposal, you will first need to register an account with the International Sociological Association. You may then submit a proposal here: https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/forum2020/rc/sessions/index.cgi?symposiumid=568

For any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact Aaron Pitluck, (Aaron.Pitluck@IllinoisState.edu) or Nadya Araujo Guimaraes, (nadya@usp.br), RC02 Forum Program Coordinators.

Setting up a Session

There are four steps to submitting a session:

  1. Groups:
    • Select the Primary (host) committee you would like to submit to. If you are proposing a joint session, use the Secondary column to select the co-host committees.
  2. Setup session:
    • Enter the title of the session, using title case capitalization (first word, first word following a colon, and proper nouns capitalized).
    • Select the session format (i.e. Oral, Poster, Roundtable).
    • Select what languages will be used in this session.
    • Enter a session description to be included on the ISA website during abstract submissions if your session is accepted.
  3. People:
    • Enter the Session Organizers for this session.
  4. Session Description:
    • Enter a description of your session to be used by the Program Coordinators during review.
    • This description will only be used in review and will not appear on the ISA website if accepted.
  5. Confirmation:
    • Make sure the information on this page is correct. Use the step links in the left frame to make modifications. DO NOT use your Internet browser Back button.

If you run into any problems, please contact technical support for assistance.


20 February - 27 May, 2019
The Avant-garde Networks of Amauta: Argentina, Mexico, and Peru in the 1920s

Sabatini Building, Floor 3, Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid

https://www.museoreinasofia.es/en/exhibitions/amautas-avant-garde-networks-argentina-mexico-and-peru-1920s

Without doubt, the Peruvian journal Amauta (1926–1930), founded and directed by José Carlos Mariátegui (Moquegua, Peru, 1894 – Lima, Peru, 1930), was one of the most influential publications in twentieth-century art. Conceived as a platform for the core debates on modernity, and in contrast to other avant-garde publications, Amauta was not the expression of one group, nor did it seek to impose one sole aesthetic or political programme. Rather, it aspired to become a medium with which to explore and discuss different movements of social transformation. Its broad network of agents and correspondents in Latin America and Europe helped to cultivate the publication, with a sizeable print run of between three and four thousand copies, and shape its substantial international impact. It is this open and diverse approach that has enabled the present exhibition — in essence limited to one periodical — to constitute a panoramic survey of Latin American avant-garde movements.

Featuring over 250 works, this show, through the invaluable collaboration of the José Carlos Mariátegui Archive, brings together not only those reproduced in Amauta but also a wide-ranging selection inspired by the exchanges that took place on the pages of the journal; works which are largely contemporary to the publication and span different mediums and formats — from painting, drawing, sculpture and photography to popular art and documentation. The artists represented include Ramón Alva de la Canal and Diego Rivera (Mexico); Camilo Blas, Martín Chambi, Julia Codesido, Elena Izcue, César Moro and José Sabogal (Peru); Norah Borges, Emilio Pettoruti and Alejandro Xul Solar (Argentina); Carlos Mérida (Guatemala); and Tina Modotti (Italy), to mention but a few.

This exhibition is organized by the Blanton Museum of Art and the Museo de Arte de Lima in collaboration with the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía and the support of Promperú.

Curators: Beverly Adams and Natalia Majluf

Exhibition Tour: 


Bulletin of Hispanic Studies
Volume: 96, Number: 2
February 2019

 
Since its founding by Edgar Allison Peers in 1923, Bulletin of Hispanic Studies has become the foremost British academic journal devoted to the languages, literatures and civilizations of Spain, Portugal and Latin America. Recognised across the world as one of the front-ranking journals in the field of Hispanic research, it is supported by an editorial committee specialising in a vast range of Hispanic scholarship.
 
You can read the current issue here, keep up to date with the journal by clicking here to sign up to new issue alerts, and can learn more about the title at its webpage here.
 
Contents:

TOP

Call for Papers

Calling Power by Its Name: contributions to psychosocial thought and practice from Latin America. 
Birkbeck, University of London

14 May 2019

DEADLINE 22 March 2019

This one-day trans-disciplinary workshop will be an innovative mix of academic presentations and experiential group work to explore different approaches to understanding power relations. It will ask the question - how do we understand power relations? How do we make them visible when they operate in part by being hidden from consciousness?

There are myriad meeting points between political ideas of emancipation and the aim of liberation implicit in the self-knowledge sought in psychoanalysis and other forms of psychological therapy. The workshop will explore applications of social psychology and psychoanalysis to critiques of economic, class, gender and racial forms of domination. 'Liberation psychology' is the term used by keynote speaker Nancy Caro Hollander to consider the thinkers and practices that hold on to the emancipatory potential of self-knowledge in a social context.

In Latin America 'consciousness raising' has long been a social endeavour. Power relations are made visible through art, music, social protest, in grassroots organising, in the expression of indigenous worldviews and in the activism that makes explicit the communication and solidarity needed to take on established power structures. Action leads to reflection leads to reflective action and new understanding and new actions.

One way to think about Latin America's significant collective efforts in defending human rights and reconstructing memory is to see the dialectic of action and reflection that create collective spaces for raising awareness individually, as well as socially.

How are current power relations being brought to collective awareness? Where can we see the social trauma of insecurity and fear bred by neoliberal economics and cuts in social spending? How is structural violence being made apparent? How do we support those facing intimidation and violence for speaking clearly to power? Who is bridging the individualistic narrative of burnout and anxiety and turning it into a collective experience?

We welcome articles, artwork, and activities that address the issue of how to render power relations visible and open them up to transformation. You can send 300-word abstracts to the convenors by March 22nd 2019.

Convenors


24 - 25 October 2019
Critical alternations and structural dominations in Latin America: Crises, resilience, and continuities”
Ecole Normale Supérieure in Lyon, France

DEADLINE 25 March 2019

The aim of this colloquium is to debate above the studies of the “right” and “left” turns in Latin America, better analyzing the evolutions of structural dominations, such as dynamics of inequalities in these societies. Here is the call for abstracts.

You are welcome to share with researchers that can be interested by the event. If you have any questions, and to send us your abstract, please contact us here: alternances.critiques@gmail.com


Gender and Resistance
Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies [SPLAS] Postgraduate Community Forum
University of Nottingham
21 - 22 June 2019

DEADLINE 29 March 2019

For the 14th year running, the University of Nottingham will be hosting the Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies [SPLAS] Postgraduate Community Forum. The event is open to anyone working on Spanish and/or Portuguese-speaking countries or cultures, from Midlands4Cities institutions and beyond, and from any disciplinary background. The Forum will take place at the University of Nottingham on Friday 21st and Saturday 22nd June 2019, and it will include a dinner at a local Brazilian-owned pub.

This year’s theme is ‘Gender and Resistance’. In addition to presentations, we will be hosting a poetry reading from the ‘Invisible Presence’ group of British Latino poets. We will also have a keynote address by Dr Courtney Campbell (University of Birmingham), whose research focuses on twentieth-century Brazil and explores themes such as race, women, beauty, gender, sports, emancipation and nation.

We welcome papers from postgraduate students, early-career researchers, artists and performers. Participants are invited to submit abstracts for 10 or 20-minute papers, on any aspect relating to the study of Spanish/Portuguese-speaking countries, cultures or issues.

Possible subject areas may include, but are not limited to:

The deadline for submissions is 29th March. Abstracts should be limited to 200 words with three key words, and bio-blurbs should be no more than 100 words. To submit your abstract please fill out this form.

Successful applicants will be notified by the end of April. Due to the inter-disciplinary nature of the Forum, we would like all papers and presentations to be in English. If you have any questions or issues when submitting the abstracts, please contact us at splasforum2019@gmail.com

More details: https://splasforum2019.wordpress.com/


11 - 13 September 2019
"Ways of Making and Doing. Women and Cinemas of Latin America"
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain)

https://coloquiomodosdehacer.tumblr.com/CFP

DEADLINE 30 March 2019

This conference aims to open up and expand on existing methodological approaches and theoretical perspectives on Latin American Women’s Filmmaking. Priority is given to the material conditions of film production over and above textual aspects, understanding the former as spaces for the co-production of the social, the political and the aesthetic. This point would be accompanied by a move away from the usual focus on the fictional feature film towards other audiovisual practices (short and medium-length films, documentaries, TV, video production...).

Moreover, we aim to problematise those Westernised positions in the field of Latin American film studies which are acritical towards the power relations inscribed in the theoretical and historiographic traditions on which they have settled. Finally, “ways of making and doing” means to be an inclusive expression with respect to a broad and plural set of practices, going beyond the scope of the directing work to integrate other types of labour and action conducted and led by women (archival work, event and festival organisation, film activism, acting, management, programming, spectatorship, etc.) without which it is not possible to understand the extended field of the audiovisual.

Possible topics include (but are not limited to):

The deadline for submissions (max. 3.000 characters, counting spaces) is the 30 March 2019. The proposals should be sent in English, Spanish or Portuguese to coloquio.modos.de.hacer@uam.es

For more information see full annexed CFP or visit the web https://coloquiomodosdehacer.tumblr.com/CFP


12 - 13 September 2019
Radical Americas Conference 2019
UCL Institute of the Americas, London

DEADLINE 20 April 2019

We are now accepting paper and panel proposals for Radical Americas 2019. While as ever we welcome papers from a wide range of disciplines on all aspects of radicalism in the Western Hemisphere (as well as papers utilising radical methodologies or approaches), the conference will this year have two broad areas of focus. For the first, we encourage presenters to face current crises: we hope to have sessions on contemporary developments in Brazil, Colombia, Venezuela, Nicaragua, the United States, and Mexico, inter alia. But we would also like to reflect on some significant anniversaries, including: the Battle of Seattle WTO protests (20) / Chiapas Uprising (25) / Fall of the Berlin Wall (30) / Grenadian Revolution (40) / Nicaraguan Revolution (40) / Stonewall Riots (50) / Woodstock (50) / Weather Underground (50) / The Execution of Fred Hampton/Mark Clark (50) / Arpanet (50) / Murder of Zapata (100). Presenters of the best papers will be encouraged to submit to the Radical Americas Journal. [https://www.ucl.ac.uk/ucl-press/browse-books/the-radical-americas-journal]

Panels will run on the 12th, followed by plenary sessions and a drinks reception, then again on the afternoon of the 13th. We plan to set aside time on the morning of 13th for workshops with activist groups/networks on how academics can better integrate and assist with, for example, transnational solidarity networks, campaigns in support of migrant rights in the UK, and defending / promoting cultures of the Americas against gentrification. Please get in touch if you have ideas for sessions here. There are inspiring collaborations between artists, scholars, public intellectuals, political movements, and artistic communities that can provide models of resistance and refusal.

Deadline for Submissions: 20th April 2019 (250 word abstracts to radicalamericas@gmail.com). Slots are 20m. Individual papers or panels of three (no all-male panels) will all be considered. Travel grants will be available to those most in need.

Two-day conference Cost: £25/£50/£75 - pay what you, or your department, can.


Call for Papers
Forced Migration: Making Sense of a Complex Ecosystem
A Special Issue of The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI)

DEADLINE 30 April 2019

We seek to bring together researchers from the information fields broadly construed, along with researchers in related disciplines, to showcase a range of concepts, practices, and methodologies available for deeper engagement with issues related to forced migration. We invite work offering diverse perspectives on forced migration as a means of enriching our understanding of the range of actors involved in this complex ecosystem. Contributions to this special issue may look at forced migration through the lens of information and media practices, embodied experiences, memory work and curation, discourses and practices around diversity, and community building in a global and digital world. This approach will pave the way for a broader interdisciplinary conversation on forced migration.

We welcome a broad spectrum of submissions that touch on the following aspects:

 We invite fully developed research papers for the Articles section, as well as shorter submissions for the Special sections; the latter may include opinion/viewpoint pieces, work in progress, reports from the field, doctoral projects, and theory-to-practice essays.

Submission Process – Important Dates

This issue will be guested edited by:

Author Guidelines and Peer Review Process

Please consult IJIDI Author Guidelines and IJIDI Peer ReviewProcess at https://jps.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/ijidi/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Any questions related to this issue should be addressed to Dr. Nadia Caidi (nadia.caidi@utoronto.ca)


Abstraction
LALSA Annual Conference
University of Bedfordshire, Luton
4 - 15 November 2019

DEADLINE 15 June 2019

Papers are invited for the LALSA Annual Conference 'Latin American Literature: Past, Present and Future'. This year, the theme of the conference is ‘Abstraction’.

The conference welcomes contributions from the scholars and students of Latin American literature. Any approach to well known or lesser known texts is welcome; any cross-disciplinary stance is encouraged. Join us and enjoy the company of like-minded scholars of Latin American literature.

Abstracts (250-350 words) are welcome in English or Spanish. Presentations will be 20 minutes long. We will let you know if your abstract has been accepted by 1 August 2019.
Please e-mail your abstract to Victoria.Carpenter@beds.ac.uk or lalsanews@gmail.com.

IMPORTANT: To submit an abstract, you must be a LALSA member. Please visit http://lalsa.net/join-us to join. There is an annual membership fee of £10 to be paid before you can register for the conference.

TOP

Conferences & Seminars

March | April | May | June | Seminar Series


19 March 2019 | 18.00 - 20.00
AMLO's strategy from pacification to militarization in Mexico?

Room 103, Institute of the Americas, 51 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PN

Speaker: Mónica Serrano is Research Professor at the Centro de Estudios Internacionales of El Colegio de México.

In July 2018 AMLO (Andrés Manuel López Obrador) and Morena secured a landslide victory in Mexico’s presidential and Congressional elections. With this electoral mandate, AMLO pledged a radical shift in the country’s security strategy. Yet, as this presentation will show, against the backdrop of a critical internal security setting inherited from the Peña Nieto administration, and an adverse external context marked by a roaring opiates crisis in the US, AMLO was forced to modify his security strategy. Indeed, as AMLO´s security initiatives pragmatically adjusted to prevailing insecurity and violent trends he fell back into the mode of militarization that has unfortunately prevailed in Mexico.

Book your place.


19 March 2019 | 17.30 - 19.30
IHR Latin American Seminar: The Invention of the Indian. Concept and Image in 19th Century Peru
Room 105, Institute of the Americas, 51 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PN

This paper identifies the emergence of a new concept of the Indian in nineteenth-century Peru through an examination of the work of the painter Francisco Laso. Tracing its origins to the late-eighteenth century, it follows the gradual formulation of a construct that was substantially different from Colonial precedents and was to establish the conceptual foundations for modern Indigenism.

Speaker: Natalia Majluf (University of Cambridge), currently Simón Bolívar Chair at the University of Cambridge, 2018-2019, is an art historian who works on the long nineteenth century in Latin America, from the era of Independence to the early twentieth century. As Head Curator and Director of the Museo de Arte de Lima, between 1995 and 2018 she oversaw the renovation of the historic building that houses the museum and was responsible for enriching and broadening the scope of the collections. She has held the Getty Curatorial Research Fellowship, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, as well as a fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, D.C. She is editor, among others, of Los incas, reyes del Perú (2005), Luis Montero’s The funerals of Atahualpa (2011), José Gil de Castro, pintor de libertadores (2014) and has co-authored Tipos del Perú. La Lima criolla de Pancho Fierro (2008), Fernando Bryce. Drawing Modern History(2011), Sabogal (2013) and Chambi (2015), among other books and exhibition catalogues.


19 & 22 March 2019 | various times (see below)
Cuba - US relations in the 21st century
Different venues (see below)

Hosted by the Latin America and Caribbean Centre (LACC). If you would like to attend the lecture or the seminar, please contact Dr Anna Cant, A.Cant1@lse.ac.uk.


20 March 2019 | 17.30 - 19.30
Depression and Decolonisation: Revisiting the 1930s in the British and French Caribbean
Rm 103, Institute of the Americas, 51 Gordon Square, London, WC1E 6BT

The 1930s were in many senses defined by the Great Depression, a decade of hunger marches, labour unrest, and political agitation across the British and French Caribbean. There remains, however, a striking contrast in the historiography derived, it seems, from the islands’ very different political futures. Historians of the British Caribbean, seeking to explain the growth of anticolonial nationalism, treat the 1930s as a turning point; historians of the French Caribbean, by contrast, seeing the interwar period as a time of continuity building up to départementalisation in 1946, give these years rather less focus. With this in mind, the paper compares the two cases. How did the islands react to the global economic crisis, why, and with what significance for their political futures?

Speaker: Michael Joseph, Oxford University. Michael Joseph is the M.G. Brock Junior Research Fellow at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. His PhD thesis examines the impact of the First World War on ideas about empire and citizenship in the British and French Caribbean. 

This event is free to attend, but places are limited so booking is required.


21 March 2019 | 17.30 onwards
How Can Art Do Political Work?
UCL Institute of Advanced Studies, Common Ground, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT

You are warmly invited to the last session of the SPLAS Research Seminar Series at UCL. The talk will be given by Prof. Mieke Bal (University of Amsterdam) on the topic ‘how can art do political work?’ focusing on Doris Salcedo’s latest work Palimpsesto (Madrid, 2017-18, London, 2018). Bal’s short documentary on this piece will be screened.


21 March 2019 | 09.00 - 17.30
Indigenous Urbanisation in Latin America
University of Sheffield, Room TBC, Sheffield, S3 7RL

The workshop will focus on the topic of indigenous urbanisation in Latin America, with emphasis on Bolivia and Brazil.

Organizers: Philipp Horn (University of Sheffield): p.horn@sheffield.ac.uk, Aiko Ikemura Amaral (University of Essex): aikemu@essex.ac.uk, Desiree Poets (Virginia Tech): dpoets@vt.edu

Latin America is characterised by profound ethno-racial divisions which are also manifested in space. Since the colonial conquest, the Latin American city was associated with a specific group of inhabitants – ‘whites’ or people of ‘mixed blood’ – who were granted citizenship rights. In contrast, the countryside was conceived of as the space of the 'Other', home to the ‘non-white’ indigenous, ethno-racially mixed or black population. These groups were denied actual citizenship and excluded from the imagery of the ‘modern’ and ‘developed’ city. Such strict ethno-racial rural-urban divides could never be fully sustained. However, they have been further blurred since the second half of the 20th century, as previously isolated rural indigenous communities and territories have been affected by urbanisation, and indigenous peoples have increasingly participated in rural-urban migratory flows. As a result, by the turn of the millennium, 35 percent of the region’s indigenous population were living in cities – this number is likely to rise to 50 percent by 2030 (UN-Habitat 2010). While a growing indigenous majority lives in urban concrete jungles, mainstream research and practice on indigeneity and indigenous development continues to focus on rural places, often offering an essentialist perspective of indigenous peoples as ‘guardians of the forest’. The combination of being simultaneously ‘urban’ and ‘indigenous’ thus remains a conundrum and largely unaddressed by scholarship.

The workshop will focus on the topic of indigenous urbanisation in Latin America, with emphasis on Bolivia and Brazil, as well as key political, social, economic, spatial, and cultural shifts related with these trends. It will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers in different career stages who will explore, among others, urban reconfigurations of indigenous identities, communities and organisation patterns; the urbanisation of rural communities; the intersectional inequalities faced by indigenous peoples in the city; and the impacts of social and spatial mobility over understandings of urban indigeneity.

This workshop is funded by the Institute of Latin American Studies (ILAS) Events Grant, the Postcolonial Studies Association (PSA) and the University of Sheffield’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning.

PROGRAMME
09.00 Welcome and Introduction by the Organisers
09.15 Keynote
  Is Black to Indigenous as Race is to Ethnicity? And the Role of the Urban in the Equation.
Peter Wade (University of Manchester)
10.15 Coffee Break
10:30 Panel I: Urban Indigenous Politics in South-East Brazil
  Law 11.645/08: implementation of indigenous history and culture in non-indigenous school curricula
Gudrun Klein (University of Manchester)
Ciclo Sagrado de Mulheres: Indigenous Feminist Activism
Jennifer Chisholm ( University of Cambridge)
Urban and indigenous in the Americas: Connecting North and South
Desiree Poets (Virginia Tech)
12.00 Lunch
13.00 Panel II: Urban Indigenous Reconfigurations: Lessons from Bolivia
  Urbanisation and indigenous identity in Rural Andean Bolivia
Jonathan Alderman (ILAS, University of London)
Envisioning gender, indigeneity and urban change in La Paz, Bolivia
Kate Maclean (Birkbeck, University of London)
Indigenous development alternatives: A youth perspective from three urban places in Bolivia
Philipp Horn (University of Sheffield)
14.30 Coffee Break
15.00 Panel III: Intersections, Mobilities and Urban Indigeneities
  Capitalising indigeneity or indigenous capitalism? The dynamic of popular market places in El Alto
Angus McNelly (Queen Mary, University of London)
From sateré-mawé villages to urban “family homes”: gender, indigeneity and technologies of housework in the city of Manaus, Brazil
Ana Luisa Sertã (Birkbeck, University of London)
Within and against indigeneity: narratives of social and spatial mobility amongst Bolivian market women in São Paulo, Brazil
Aiko Ikemura Amaral (University of Essex)
16.30 Conclusions & Next Steps
17.30 END

26 March 2019 | 18.00 - 21.00
Ideas out of place: city making and the reproduction of spatial injustice in Rio de Janeiro
King’s Building, Strand Campus, London

Part of the King's Brazil Institute Seminar Series.

The speaker Gabriel Silvestre is a lecturer in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the University of Sheffield where he coordinates the masters programme MA Cities and Global Development. He holds a PhD in Planning Studies from University College London and has previously taught at the same institution and at the University of Westminster. His research interests include the topics of planning theory in Latin America, the governance of large-scale regeneration projects and the urban impacts of hosting mega-events.

Contact: anna.grimaldi@kcl.ac.uk


26 March 2019 | 18.00 - 20.00
Opportunities and Race
1 Park Crescent, Marylebone, London W1B 1SH

This event is kindly sponsored by the Foreign & Commonwealth Office.

Canning House’s Opportunities Series examines, through various lenses, the opportunities and obstacles faced by disadvantaged groups in Latin America.

The second event, Opportunities and Race, considers the approaches to tackling racial inequalities.

The panel currently includes Zamila Bunglawala, Deputy Director of the Race Disparity Unit at the Cabinet Office, and Professor Peter Wade, Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Manchester.

You can read about the first event, Opportunities and Gender, here. Ticket price includes wine and nibbles. Students will be asked to show their student card on entry to the event.

Attendance
For pricing and booking information please use this link.


26 March 2019 | 17.00 - 19.00
Life after Dictatorship: Authoritarian Successor Parties in Latin America and Beyond
Room 103, Institute of the Americas, 51 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PN

This talk will be based on James Loxton and Scott Mainwaring's new book: 'Life after Dictatorship: Authoritarian Successor Parties Worldwide'

Life after Dictatorship launches a new research agenda on authoritarian successor parties worldwide. Authoritarian successor parties are parties that emerge from authoritarian regimes, but that operate after a transition to democracy. They are one of the most common but overlooked features of the global democratic landscape. They are major actors in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America, and they have been voted back into office in over one-half of all third-wave democracies. This book presents a new set of terms, definitions, and research questions designed to travel across regions, and presents new data on these parties' prevalence and frequent return to power. With chapters from leading Africanists, Asianists, Europeanists, and Latin Americanists, it asks: why are authoritarian successor parties so common? Why are some more successful than others? And in what ways can they harm - or help - democracy?

Speaker: James Loxton is a Lecturer in Comparative Politics in the Department of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney. James studies democratization, authoritarian regimes, and political parties, particularly in Latin America. His research focuses on “authoritarian successor parties,” or parties that emerge from authoritarian regimes but that operate after a transition to democracy. James is the co-editor of Life after Dictatorship: Authoritarian Successor Parties Worldwide (Cambridge University Press, 2018) and Challenges of Party-Building in Latin America (Cambridge University Press, 2016).

Book your place.


26 March 2019 | 09.30 - 20.00
Law at the margins of the city

Clore Management B01, Birkbeck, University of London

Keynote speakers:

This one day conference is taking place with the support of Birkbeck School of Law, the Centre for Research on Law and Race and the Socio-Legal Studies Association. The conference will also host the book launch of Rolnik’s Urban Warfare: Housing under the Empire of Finance (Verso 2019)

Confirmed speakers

View the programme [PDF].

The event is free, but registration is required.


27 March 2019 | 17.00 - 19.00
The Work of Activism in a Digital Age: #feminism and online hypermasculinity
103, Institute of the Americas, 51 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PN

Feminist Politics and Conservative Backlash in Brazil: A seminar series
Co-organized by the University of West London

Brazil's 2018 election cycle was marked by unprecedented turmoil: The assassination of activist and city councilor Marielle Franco; the arrest of former president Lula; the rise and eventual election of Jair Bolsonaro. It was also a period of intense feminist mobilization, both on the streets and online: Mass demonstrations took place across 114 cities and were integrated through vibrant, wide-reaching digital campaigns. This symposium invites an interdisciplinary group of Brazilian academics to address the gendered political dynamics that shaped Brazil’s most recent elections and discuss the rise of the radical right at a time of expansion (and consolidation) of a broad feminist protest movement. For example: What forms of resistance are feminist activists (re)creating in Brazil? How does the recent cycle of new feminist movements impact manifestations of masculinity? Can ‘culture wars’ explain the current political polarization in Brazil? How can the attention to inequality and power structures be intersectionally combined to inform a broader understanding of Brazil’s current political scenario?

Book your place.


27 March 2019 | 18.00 onwards
Party Politics and Social Mobilization in Contemporary Argentina: Re-engagement and Struggle

Bancroft Building Room 1.02.6, Mile End Campus, Queen Mary, UoL

Organised by the Queen Mary Latin American Network and Action for Argentina UK.

This talk will provide an updated context on the political situation in Argentina in 2019 from the perspective of electoral politics and social movement mobilisation, with a view towards the elections of 2019.

"Party Politics and Social Mobilization in Contemporary Argentina: Re-engagement and Struggle”, by Dr Sebastián Mauro (University of Buenos Aires)

Entry: Free and open to all. No need to book. Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/303817960282317/


28 March 2019 | 18.00 - 21.00
Independent Comics in Brazil, Lecture and Discussion
Espaço Hélio Oiticica and Auditório Alberto Cavalcanti, 14-16 Cockspur Street, London SW1Y 5BL

Brazil's comics scene is livelier than ever. Comic festivals are flourishing across the country, and Brazilian comics and graphic novelists are gaining international reputation: Moon and Bá’s Daytripper (2010) featured on the New York Times’ bestseller list, while their graphic novel version of Milton Hatoum’s novel Dois Irmãos was translated in English in 2015. 

The foremost among this generation of comic book artists is Rafael Coutinho. He has been highly active in the Brazilian comics scene as both an artist and an entrepreneur. 

Rafael Coutinho will be joined by Dr Edward King, Senior Lecturer in Portuguese and Latin American Studies at the University of Bristol. After presenting an overview of Coutinho’s work, they will discuss the wider Brazilian comic scene and potential for expanding into international markets. There will then be half an hour for questions and an open discussion, followed by drinks.

Rafael Coutinho is the author of a number of successful graphic novels including Mensur, shortlisted for Brazil’s most prestigious literary prize, 'Prêmio Jabuti' in 2018. He has been at the centre of most of the innovations in the Brazilian comic scene. He co-founded the indie publishers Narval Comix and spear-headed the crowdfunding of comics in Brazil. He also founded the comics festival Des.Grafica in collaboration with São Paulo’s Museu da Imagem e do Som, which includes a competition to publish the work of new artists.

RSVP (essental).


2 April 2019 | 17.30 to 18.30
A Management Model to Face Public Security Crisis in Brazil
Strand Building, Strand Campus, King's College London, London

A crisis is an uncertain event with a low probability of occurring and high impact, which threatens the individual, organisation, community, or nation, exceeding its response capacity and demanding fast decision-making (Nogueira, 2018). A widely accepted view is that crises may be differentiated from other events by the challenge they present to established assumptions and mechanisms for response and mitigation. This seminar will present practical and applied aspects to cope with the contemporary public security crisis revealing a management model to face the public security crisis in Brazil. Some insightful questions arise and will be critically reflected and answered: What are the main problems or challenges in the public security crisis in Brazil? What are the key indicators to build a management model to face the public security crisis in Brazil? How to solve these problems/challenges or at least mitigate them?

Speaker: Professor Dr Jose Helano Matos Nogueira is a police officer at Brazilian federal Police and has three postgraduate courses Doctor of Business Administration at University of Liverpool/UK; Master of Business Administration at National Police Academy/Brazil; Master of Science in Computer Science at PUC University/Brazil. Currently, Dr Helano is an academic visitor at King's College London UK, recognized teacher and supervisor at the University of Liverpool in the UK, and professor at Farias Brito University in Brazil, and has 25 years' teaching and research experience on business administration and information technology in several universities. He has supervised dozens of postgraduate students (doctorate and master) in the field of business administration and computer science during the preparation of their theses, dissertations, and projects. In addition, a researcher, he has more than 80 scientific publications, including peer-reviewed articles and books. On the other hand, Professor Dr Helano has professional experience in crisis management, disaster management, international business, global leadership, strategic management, and IT management as Senior Manager of the Olympic Games, International Police Cooperation Coordinator of the FIFA World Cup, Police Forensics Director of INTERPOL, and Head of Forensics Department at Brazilian Federal Police.

Book your place.


3 Apr 2019 | 17.00 - 18.30
Olivia Casagrande (Manchester) 'Manchas y parches: (Un)making the indigenous city through performance and critical mapping in Santiago, Chile'
A215, Samuel Alexander Building, University of Manchester

Organiser: School of Arts, Languages and Cultures
Speaker: Dr Olivia Casagrande

Part of the Centre for Latin American and Caribbean Studies Research Seminar. 


30 April 2019 | 17.00 - 19.00
An Intersectional Approach to Violence: Marginalized groups under conservatism
103, Institute of the Americas, 51 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PN

Feminist Politics and Conservative Backlash in Brazil: A seminar series
Co-organized by the University of West London

An Intersectional Approach to Violence: Marginalized groups under conservatism

Brazil's 2018 election cycle was marked by unprecedented turmoil: The assassination of activist and city councilor Marielle Franco; the arrest of former president Lula; the rise and eventual election of Jair Bolsonaro. It was also a period of intense feminist mobilization, both on the streets and online: Mass demonstrations took place across 114 cities and were integrated through vibrant, wide-reaching digital campaigns. This symposium invites an interdisciplinary group of Brazilian academics to address the gendered political dynamics that shaped Brazil’s most recent elections and discuss the rise of the radical right at a time of expansion (and consolidation) of a broad feminist protest movement. For example: What forms of resistance are feminist activists (re)creating in Brazil? How does the recent cycle of new feminist movements impact manifestations of masculinity? Can ‘culture wars’ explain the current political polarization in Brazil? How can the attention to inequality and power structures be intersectionally combined to inform a broader understanding of Brazil’s current political scenario?

Book your place.


1 May 2019 | 13.00 - 14.00
The French penal colony as site of memory: dark tourism, difficult heritage and the politics of the past.
Old Library Building 2.20, Newcastle University

Speaker: Charles Forsdick (University of Liverpool)

The paper draws on recent fieldwork in French Guiana, New Caledonia and Vietnam, as well as readings of a wide corpus of literary and visual culture, to explore the status of French penal colonies as lieux de mémoire. The aim is, in part, to interrogate Nora’s concept, revealing its blind spots in relation to colonial history and postcolonial memory. At the same time, however, the presentation locates the bagne in relation to recent work by Claire Anderson and others on the global history of penal transportation and the existence of a carceral archipelago of transcontinental dimensions. The analysis focuses on specific sites in the former French colonial empire, establishing connections between them whilst foregrounding specific issues – of postcolonial ruination, of dark tourism, of memory politics and multi-layered, multidirectional histories – relating to their afterlives. The paper is part of an attempt to initiate dialogue around the role of modern languages in research on dark tourism and difficult heritage.

This seminar is part of the SML research seminar series and is open for all colleagues and students to attend, no registration necessary.


2 - 3 May 2019 | 10.00 - 17.00
The Queer Art of Feeling: Sensation, Emotion and the Body in Queer Cultures
University of Cambridge

Keynote: Sara Ahmed
Convenors: Geoffrey Maguire (Cambridge), Fraser Riddell (Oxford) and Tom Smith (St Andrews)

This conference explores the potential of the arts to represent, explore, challenge and create modes of queer lived, felt and embodied experience. Taking ‘feeling’ in all its meanings – touch, hapticity, sensation, emotion, a hunch or gut reaction, as well as tentativeness when ‘feeling one’s way’ – the conference will explore the complex relationships to culture and society that are at stake in queer artworks and queer experience.

For further information and how to attend, please contact the University of Cambridge, queerartoffeeling@gmail.com, 020 7862 8871.


11 May 2019 | 10.00 - 17.00
Latin American Music Seminar
The Court Room, First Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

If you wish to present a paper, live performance, or to be included on the Latin American Music Seminar email list, please contact Henry Stobart.

Book your place.


17 May 2019 | 17.00 - 18.30
The Representation of Spanish American Interests at the Imperial Court in the Age of the Bourbon Reforms, c. 1750-1808
LAC Seminar Room, 1 Church Walk, Oxford

Speaker: Alvaro Caso Bello (Johns Hopkins University)
Convener: Eduardo Posada-Carbo

A Latin American History Seminar.

Speaker: Álvaro Caso Bello is a Ph.D. candidate in History at Johns Hopkins University, having previously completed an M.A. in History at Hopkins. He recently co-edited, with Gabriel Paquette, a new edition of Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos’ most influential writings in G.M. de Jovellanos Report on the Agrarian Law (1795) and other writings (London: Anthem Press, 2016). He has published journal articles and book chapters for publications from Chile, Spain, Paraguay, and Uruguay. His research has been supported by the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History, the École des Hautes Études Hispaniques et Ibériques-Casa de Velázquez, the Charles Singleton Center for the Study of Pre-Modern Europe, and the Program for Latin American Studies at Johns Hopkins.


NEW

18 May 2019 | 09.40 - 17.00
South American Archaeology Seminar
UCL, Institute of Archaeology, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY

SAAS - May 2019.pdf

Attendees are asked to make a contribution of £10.00 towards the cost of coffee, tea & lunch
Please book at: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/event-ticketing/booking/?ev=18068-1

Our next meeting date is: Friday and Saturday  22nd and 23rd November 2019, this will be a joint event with the Latin American Music Seminar focusing on prehispanic music, for further details or to offer a paper please contact Dianne Scullin.

If you would like to give a talk at a future South American Archaeology Seminar or for further information please contact Bill Sillar.


22 May 2019 | 13.00 - 14.00
Gendered Touristic Security in La Antigua Guatemala

Old Library Building 2.20, Newcastle University

Speaker: Sarah Becklake (Lancaster University)

Touristic security is the neoliberal practice of securing tourists to sustain tourism. In the aim of making tourists feel safe and keeping them from actual harm, a plethora of touristic security strategies are employed which represent, govern, restructure, and discipline place and people as ‘safe’ for tourists. This practice and its strategies are highly informed by and informing of inequalities, especially geopolitical inequalities between the Global North and Global South and embodied inequalities between different groups of people. Drawing upon ethnographic research in the small city of La Antigua Guatemala, this paper pays particular attention to the role of gender in touristic security. While gendered bodies, discourses, and practices inform who is deemed touristically threatened and threatening, and, thus, who comes to sit at the soft centre or sharp ends of touristic security strategies, they are also strategically mobilized in the aim of making Guatemala safe for, especially, Western female tourists. More than making Western female tourists feel safe and keeping them from actual harm, gendered touristic security is (re)producing inequalities, producing new threats/risks for Guatemalans, and creating different worlds of (in)security.

The event is co-convened by the School of Modern Languages and the Gender Research Group  . Refreshments will be provided.

This seminar is open for all colleagues and students to attend, no registration necessary.


3 June 2019 | 11.00 - 17.00
The Present State and Future of Latin American History in the UK
51 Gordon Square, Room 103, UCL, London WC1H 0PN

Convenors: Mark Thurner (ILAS-UoL) and Paulo Drinot (IA-UCL)

Book your place.


20 - 21 June 2019 | 10.00 - 18.00
Art and Cinema in 21st-Century Peru: Aesthetics, Politics and Platform

The Court Room, First Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

Covenors:

The 21st -Century is witnessing a new moment of growth for Peru’s visual arts. Since the recovery of democracy and the rise of new social aspirations at the beginning of the century the arts have played a significant role in re-thinking the past and re-imagining the country. Filmmakers and artists from new generations and from diverse socioeconomic sectors and regions have emerged bringing new visual aesthetics and different forms of social and political engagement. In addition, the growth of Peru’s economy in the region in tandem with rapid urban neoliberal transformations and an incisive national branding campaign have impacted the arts and cinema in terms of production, audiences and distribution. Within these contexts, both the arts and cinema have developed more consolidated fields connected to local situations and transnational circuits in the hands of private initiatives and, although precarious and intermittent, state cultural policy. Despite the strengthening of these fields, a fragility persists in their growth and the diversity of their approaches.

This two-day international conference proposes to trace the transformations of Peru’s contemporary art and cinema in terms of aesthetics, actors, politics and circuits in relation to the political economy. How have cinema and art been redefined in the last two decades? How have they worked to support the socio-political development and a more nuanced understanding of different parts of the country? Which are the socio-political processes that shape and are re-shaped by these forms of visual production? Who are the agents and which are the cultural politics of this transformation? What is the role of the market in this transformation? What are the absences, fragilities and paradoxes that accompany the rise of Peru’s arts and cinema?

This event is co-sponsored by: Institute of Latin American Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London; University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Grupo de Investigación en Antropología Visual, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, and the Peruvian Embassy in London

Further information and how to attend, please contact Olga Jimenez olga.jimenez@sas.ac.uk, 020 7862 8871.


Thursdays | 17.30 onwards (unless otherwise stated)
Latin American Anthropology Seminar Series
Room 333, UCL Rockefeller Building, 21 University Street, London WC1E 6DE

All are welcome. Attendance is free.

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Events

NEW

18 - 30 March 2019
Glances of Resistance: The Nicaraguan Uprising Through Artistic Narratives
Senate House, Second Floor Lobby, London

This collective exhibition of protest and resistance art was produced as an immediate response to the political crisis in Nicaragua, which began on the 18th of April, 2018. It was first shown on the 19th of July in Berlin, on the anniversary of the Sandinista Revolution. It has since travelled to Cologne, Bielefeld, Mannheim, Frankfurt, Paris, Oslo and Trondheim. On view will be a selection of work from over 100 young artists and photographers’ submissions to an original open call by SOSNicaragua-Germany.

This exhibition is organised by SOSNicaragua-Deutschland, with the support of SOSNicaragua-UK, Morada Feminista Nicaragua-UK, and the European Research Council (ERC) as a part of the project “Citizens of Photography: The Camera and the Political Imagination” at UCL Anthropology.

Book your place.


21 March 2019
"Indigenous Urbanisation in Latin America"
Department of Urban Studies and Planning, University of Sheffield

Organisers: Philipp Horn, University of Sheffield: p.horn@sheffield.ac.uk Aiko Ikemura Amaral, University of Essex: aikemu@essex.ac.uk Desiree Poets, Virginia Tech: dpoets@vt.edu

Latin America is characterised by profound ethno-racial divisions which are also manifested in space. Since the colonial conquest, the Latin American city was associated with a specific group of inhabitants – ‘whites’ or people of ‘mixed blood’ – who were granted citizenship rights. In contrast, the countryside was conceived of as the space of the 'Other', home to the ‘non-white’ indigenous, ethno-racially mixed or black population. These groups were denied actual citizenship and excluded from the imagery of the ‘modern’ and ‘developed’ city.  Such strict ethno-racial rural-urban divides could never be fully sustained. However, they have been further blurred since the second half of the 20th century, as previously isolated rural indigenous communities and territories have been affected by urbanisation, and indigenous peoples have increasingly participated in rural-urban migratory flows. As a result, by the turn of the millennium, 35 percent of the region’s indigenous population were living in cities – this number is likely to rise to 50 percent by 2030 (UN-Habitat 2010). While a growing indigenous majority lives in urban concrete jungles, mainstream research and practice on indigeneity and indigenous development continues to focus on rural places, often offering an essentialist perspective of indigenous peoples as ‘guardians of the forest’. The combination of being simultaneously ‘urban’ and ‘indigenous’ thus remains a conundrum and largely unaddressed by scholarship. 

The workshop will focus on the topic of indigenous urbanisation in Latin America, with emphasis on Bolivia and Brazil, as well as key political, social, economic, spatial, and cultural shifts related with these trends. It will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers in different career stages who will explore, among others, urban reconfigurations of indigenous identities, communities and organisation patterns; the urbanisation of rural communities; the intersectional inequalities faced by indigenous peoples in the city; and the impacts of social and spatial mobility over understandings of urban indigeneity. 

The workshop will take place at the University of Sheffield on Thursday, 21 March 2019. Speakers will give a 15-minute presentation/provocation before opening for questions and general debate, as detailed in the programme below. For those interested in joining the discussion, we have space for approx. 20 more people to attend the event. Places will be allocated according to a first come first served basis. In case you want to attend the workshop, please register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/workshop-indigenous-urbanisation-in-latin-america-registration-53019850801


25 April – 5 May 2019
La Linea 19: The London Latin Music Festival

This 10-day festival, now in its nineteenth year, hosts global superstars and the very best emerging talent from across the Latin Music world.

Boasting an impressive array of UK debuts, world premieres and rare UK appearances, and taking place across London’s concert halls, clubs, and art hubs, the festival will once again showcase the diversity of new Latin music on an international scale with a strong bill featuring hypnotic Cuban nu-electronica, ska, Argentinian psychedelic rhythms, samba-infused jazz from Brazil, and much more.

Some of the events taking place:

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Publications

The School-to-Work Transition in Brazil: Patterns and Determinants of Young People Trajectories
Series: School-to-work Transition Survey
International Labour Organization

Written and compiled by Nadya Araujo Guimarães, Leticia Marteleto and Murillo Marschner Alves de Brito

This text is the fruit of process of collaboration and discussions coordinated by the ILO Office in Brasilia, in the framework of the international comparative research Project on “The School-to-Work Transition Survey (SWTS) of Youth”, financed by the Mastercard Foundation.

Technical workshops were held, starting in 2013, and a Consultative Council on the SWTS was created, composed of technical representatives of organizations acting in this area, including the Ministry of Labour and Employment, the Ministry of Social Development, the Ministry of Education, the National Secretary of Youth, the National Statistical Office (IBGE), the Institute for Applied Economic Research (IPEA) and the Department for Inter-Trade Union for Economic, Social and Statistical Research (DIEESE). The Consultative Council on the SWTS analysed the generic questionaire for the research project, and revised in light of the Brazilian context and validated the methodology. The questionnaire was applied in face-to-face interviews conducted with a representative national sample of 3,288 young people.

Read


NEW

International Women's Day - The Strength and the Challenges
Americas Updater,
Special Isssue

In this issue, we look at the question of why women are being disappeared by focusing on three contexts in our hemisphere: Brazil, Mexico and Native Americans in the US and Canada. The common thread of discrimination and societal indifference runs throughout, but so does the struggle by women themselves to call attention to the crime, find the women and end disappearance.

We also celebrate a victory--in El Salvador, three women accused of aborting were released from prison. They had served more than three decades behind bars between them, but their liberation was a cause for celebration and the result of women's mobilization for their freedom. Finally, we feature a new video on the crime of pederasty in the Mexican church, just as 101 clergymen have been recognized by the church as guilty of the crime. We also interview Maria Herrera, mother of four disappeared sons and a leader in organizing family members of the disappeared throughout Mexico and the citizen search brigades to look for them.

With more than 30 years of experience in Latin American news and analysis, the Americas Program of the Center for International Policy is a leading source of information for activists, academics and citizens concerned about US foreign policy toward Latin America and movements for social justice within the hemisphere.

Contact Us: CIP Americas Programinfo@americas.org | www.americas.org | www.americas.org/es/

Articles:

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Funding

NEW

AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Studentship: North American Indigenous Languages in the British Library's Post-1850 Collections
University of Hull
Covers tuition fees & stipend

DEADLINE 15 April 2019

Applications for this funding are open to UK Students, EU Students and International Students.

The British Library and the University of Hull are pleased to invite applications for a Collaborative Doctoral Partnership PhD Studentship, starting from 1 October 2019. This doctoral award is funded through the Arts and Humanities Research Council under its Collaborative Doctoral Programme. The research will be jointly supervised by Professor Joy Porter at the University of Hull, and Dr Fran Fuentes, Curator for North American Printed Collections at the British Library. The student will receive further support at the British Library from Nora McGregor, Digital Curator of the Digital Scholarship department, and from a secondary team at the forefront of indigenous language studies that includes, Professor Dale Turner (Anishinaabe), Department of Native Studies, Dartmouth College; Mishiikenh; Vernon Altiman, (Anishinaabe) Lecturer, Department of Languages, Literatures & Cultures, Queen’s University, Ontario; Professor Marianne Mithun, President of the Association of American Linguistics, University of California, Santa Barbara.

The successful candidate will undertake interdisciplinary transnational research on ‘North American Indigenous Languages In The British Library’s Post-1850s Collections’ that engages with current debates about the role of libraries in collecting, preserving and promoting indigenous languages, and the ethical issues that such activities raise.

The successful candidate would be expected to develop the research topic for the PhD thesis around their own interests and expertise, within the collaborative framework of the project detailed below.

The Project

This role poses an exciting opportunity to explore the practical and ethical issues in employing and promoting digital research methods, tools and technologies to the study of the indigenous record; and developing recommendations as to a sustainable future collections practice which balances the interests of indigenous communities, the British Library, and researchers.

The student will be encouraged in year one to use Student Development Funding (see below) and institutional funding to complete one or more short but intensive indigenous language competence courses run by secondary co-supervisor Mishiikenh in Ontario. They will use this acquired knowledge of Anishinaabe and work as closely as possible with indigenous communities so as to generate the first survey, identification & tagging of indigenous language holdings in a series of BL collections and to identify and improve catalogue records in relation to indigenous languages. The student will begin by engaging specifically with BL Boarding School publications and the variety of material therein (primers, reference texts and indigenous creative output), before going on to explore dictionaries and religious texts in translation, as well as 20th century Native newspapers, activist campaign materials and literature by indigenous authors and poets. To help comprehend this work in indigenous context, they will be encouraged to explore methodologies linked to the indigenizing of both digital humanities research and collection practice, including 'up-streaming', analysis of asymmetries of power within post or neo-colonial contexts and linguistic code switching as defined by Penelope Gardner-Chloros and others. 

The student will also be encouraged to explore ways the British Library could bring the rich diversity of indigenous perspectives, notably those of indigenous elders, into dialogue with access portals and collections containing indigenous languages. A starting solution for this may be the use of ‘critical making’ methodologies and the use of collaborative metadata creation, prototype digital collections and portals whereby users have the chance to interact with language materials.

Institutional Framework

The student will be registered at the University of Hull (Department of History) but will have a substantive presence at the British Library over the course of the project. This will be important to ensure a clear understanding of the research context, engagement with resources, and promote a good working relationship with British Library colleagues.

At the British Library, the student will sit within the Americas team who curate the North American, Latin American, and Caribbean post-1850 collections. The team currently includes two CDP students. Additionally, they will benefit from contact with the Eccles Centre team which includes an area-studies bibliographer. The Eccles Centre support researchers working with the Library’s area collections, and the student would be able to partake in a rich and lively research culture that includes regular conferences and events.

The student will have an opportunity to work closely with colleagues in the British Library’s Digital Scholarship team whose mission and extensive experience is in enabling the use of the Library’s digital collections for research, engaging with and advocating for the needs of the digital research community, and helping to make more of the Library’s collection available online.

The student will become part of a vibrant cohort of collaborative doctoral researchers and benefit from staff-level access to BL collections, resources and training programmes, including the opportunity to participate in courses run by the in-house Digital Scholarship Team. The student will benefit from the dedicated programme of professional development and networking events delivered by the Library in tandem with the other museums, galleries and heritage organisations affiliated with the AHRC CDP scheme.

At the University of Hull, the student will join a recognized cultural research context and lively postgraduate community. They will benefit particularly from links to the Treatied Spaces Research Cluster, a group dedicated to the study of Native treaties, particularly Iroquois-Crown diplomacy and the role of language, material culture and processes of exchange over time. Doctoral students at Hull have their own Faculty desk-space, have access to a variety of Faculty training and professional development opportunities and will be automatically enrolled in a suite of modules and workshops offered by the University Graduate School, notably the 60-credit PG Certificate in Arts and Humanities Research. The student will also benefit from a range of training, employability and development modules run through the two consortia run from the department of History: the AHRC-funded Heritage Consortium and the North of England Consortium for the Arts & Humanities, as well from the ESRC-funded White Rose Social Sciences DTP, within which History leads a programme.

Person Specifications

We are seeking to recruit a highly promising student who will relish the opportunity of combining language acquisition and digital research skills with the experience of working as part of a professional team of researchers, curators and indigenous communities. Students should have strong communication skills that facilitate work in a range of different environments, and the ability to learn to use software tools independently, by following tutorials and documentation (with additional support provided by British Library staff where appropriate).

Eligibility

1. Type of Award

  • A fully funded studentship award that covers the cost of approved tuition fees and provides a stipend, plus an additional amount p/a for research expenses.

2. Residency Criteria

  • British nationals who have lived in the UK and Islands all their lives are eligible.
  • Also eligible are non-British nationals who have settled status AND have been resident in the UK for 3 years immediately prior to the date of the start of the course.
  • EU nationals who have been ordinarily resident in the UK and Islands for three years immediately prior to the date of start of the course are eligible.
  • EEA and Swiss nationals (EEA migrant workers) should refer to the full RCUK guidelines to check eligibility and may be eligible for a fees only award.
  • Please refer to pages 17-18 of the RCUK Training Grant Guide

3. Academic Criteria

Applicants are required to hold a Master’s degree by 1 September 2019 or be in a position to demonstrate equivalent experience. This may include experience in museum, library, or digital humanities research, research-related employment, or specific indigenous language or linguistic expertise.

Funding Information

The studentship is available for full-time study (or part-time equivalent), and applicants must be able to commence their studies on 1 October 2019.

The Studentship is awarded for 3.5 years andwill cover tuition fees and a stipend at the standard UKRI rate (£15,009 in 2019/20 or part-time equivalent) plus an additional £550 p/a. This is supplemented by an expenses allowance of up to £1,000 p/a from the British Library for research-related costs. Student Development Funding, equivalent to an additional 6 months of funding, is available to support further training and skills development opportunities that are agreed as part of the PhD programme (e.g. indigenous language courses, as suggested above) and may be used to extend the studentship accordingly.

The Eccles Centre will support the student with a further bursary of £700 a year, to cover additional costs incurred for travel between the British Library and the University of Hull for the duration of the PhD.

To apply for these Scholarships please click on the Apply button above.

PhD students at the University of Hull follow modules for research and transferable skills development and gain a Masters level Certificate, or Diploma, in Research Training, in addition to their research degree.

Informal Enquiries

For enquiries about the application procedure, please contact the University of Hull Graduate School at gs@hull.ac.uk  Tel: +44 (0)1482 466822.

Informal enquiries about the project itself can be sent to Professor Joy Porter at joy.porter@hull.ac.uk Tel: +44 (0)1482 465460 &/or Dr Francisca Fuentes at Fran.Fuentes@bl.uk

Interview Date

Monday 13 May 2019. Interviews will take place at the British Library, 96 Euston Road, London NW1 2DB.


E. Allison Peers Memorial Doctoral Studentship & Master’s Bursary in Iberian & Latin American Studies 2019
University of Liverpool, Department of Modern Languages and Cultures

DEADLINE 30 April 2019

Fees, plus stipend, to support study in Iberian and Latin American Studies

Applications are invited for E. Allison Peers postgraduate funding: one PhD Studentship and one Master’s Bursary in Iberian and Latin American Studies, to begin on 1 October 2019. The Scholarships provides full fees at the Home/EU student rate (approx. £4,260) for students undertaking the MRes or the PhD in Modern Languages and Cultures (Iberian and Latin American Studies pathways), plus a £5,000 yearly stipend.

Subject areas

Teaching and research in Iberian and Latin American Studies at Liverpool is informed by a plurilingual, pluricultural understanding of the Luso-Hispanic world. We welcome applications from students wishing to undertake research in any one or more of Basque Studies, Catalan Studies, Portuguese Studies (Brazilian and European), Spanish Studies and Latin American Studies. We especially encourage applications that are comparative or relational, and which cross languages and national borders. Possible focuses for study include: cultural politics and the politics of culture; popular culture; film and visual culture; literary studies; digital culture; gender and sexuality; transnational, postnational and postcolonial studies; migration and diaspora; memory and representation.

Application and selection process

Scholarships will be awarded on the basis of demonstrated academic excellence. Applicants are required to make contact with a potential supervisor for assistance in formulating a research proposal; applicants can view a list of potential supervisors and their specialist areas on the expression of interest forms for the MRes and the PhD bursaries.

Completed expressions of interest should reach the department through the contacts below by 30 April 2019. Applicants for an E. Allison Peers Scholarship must also make a formal application for admittance to the MRes or the PhD in Modern Languages (Hispanic and Latin American Studies pathways) at the University of Liverpool by that same date.

More information

Download full information on the MA bursary and the PhD studentship, including application forms here: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/modern-languages-and-cultures/news/stories/title,1103051,en.php

For more information about the scheme or an informal discussion, please contact: 

Details of our MRes in Modern Languages and Cultures and our PhD programmes in Hispanic and Latin American Studies can be found on our department website. Find out more about Postgraduate study at the University of Liverpool


2 x MA Scholarships in Modern Languages and Cultures
School of Arts, Cultures and Languages, University of Manchester
2019 - 20

DEADLINE 30 April 2019 | 17.00 GMT

From the legacy of Winifred Margaret Dodd Borland, the scholarships of £10,000 each, are to be offered to students wishing to work on Spanish, Hispanic American or Russian topics.

Applications are invited for the School of Arts, Cultures and Languages Masters in Modern Languages and Cultures. The MA in Modern Languages and Cultures master’s course prepares students for further research in constituent disciplines, but it is also aimed at those who wish to broaden and deepen their critical engagement with the wide array of languages and cultures you can study as part of our programme. The structure of the MA is flexible, which means that you can choose to combine your interests in different languages or cultures, or you can choose to focus more exclusively on one particular area.

Modern Languages at The University of Manchester provide a thriving environment, with its vibrant research culture, University Language Centre facilities, its close links to a wide range of cultural partners across the city and its access to the world-class John Rylands research library. While this MA offers you a range of exciting modules that are chronologically or geographically specific, all course units are informed by recent theoretical and historical developments that allow you to think about categories like 'language' and 'culture' in nuanced and fresh ways.

For more information: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/masters/courses/list/11966/ma-modern-languages-and-cultures/#course-profile

For further information on how to apply for the above scholarship, please visit:https://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-funding/ [click on ‘Modern Languages and Cultures’]

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Jobs

Postdoctoral Fellowships
ESRC Northwest Social Sciences Doctoral Training Centre
Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, University of Liverpool

DEADLINE 22 March 2019, no later than 16.00 GMT

Applications are invited for the ESRC Postdoctoral Fellowship Scheme as part of the Language-Based Area Studies Pathway (Latin American Studies). We are one of the longest established and most broadly-based centres for the study of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies in the UK. Research at Liverpool is characterised by wide-ranging interests in the national and global dimensions of Latin American Studies, with a particular emphasis on social science, historical and cultural studies research.

The Postdoctoral Fellowship (PDF) Scheme is aimed at providing a career development opportunity for those in the immediately postdoctoral stage of their career, to provide the opportunity to consolidate their PhD through developing publications, their networks, and their research and professional skills.

The ESRC have awarded funding to the NWSSDTP to support seven Postdoctoral Fellowships per annum, which must take place at one of the NWSSDTP institutions, including the University of Liverpool.

The call is open to applicants who have completed their PhD at a research organisation that is part of a DTP or CDT (not necessarily the NWSSDTP) and who are within 12 months of completing their PhD.

The call for October 2019 entry is now live, with a deadline of the 16:00 on the 22nd March 2019.

Please find the application paperwork below:

  1. ESRC PDF Call specification
  2. ESRC PDF FAQs
  3. ESRC PDF application form

Informal enquiries should be addressed to the departmental Research Lead, Prof. Robert Blackwood (rjb@liverpool.ac.uk).


Reader/ Chair in International Relations
School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy, Royal Holloway, University of London
Full Time, Permanent
£52,266 + per annum inclusive, over two grades
Ref: 0219-052

DEADLINE 29 March 2019

£52,266 to £63,752 per annum inclusive of London Allowance (Reader)

£62,132 and above (Professor)

Applications are invited for the post of Reader/ Chair in International Relations in the School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy

The School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy at Royal Holloway seeks to appoint two senior academics in the field of international relations. Appointments may be at the level of Reader (associate professor) or as full Professor. The successful applicants would be expected to start in September 2019.

The School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy is a research-intensive unit that offers teaching which both challenges and enriches students. We provide a full range of undergraduate, postgraduate and doctoral programmes. We carry out research across the different disciplines, but we place special emphasis on our research centres: the Centre for International Public Policy (CIPP), the Centre for Islamic and West Asian Studies (CIWAS), the Centre for the Politics of Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East (AAME), the Democracy and Elections Centre, and the New Political Communications Unit.

We welcome applications from leading scholars in the field of International Relations. This call is open with respect to subfield, but applicants should be able to contribute to the intellectual life and development of one of the research centres listed above. We are particularly interested in applicants who specialise in international security (understood broadly), foreign policy analysis, and international relations theory.

Successful applicants will have a record of publications which are world-leading in terms of their originality, significance and rigour, and which would contribute strongly to the School’s submission to the forthcoming Research Excellence Framework (REF). Successful applicants will also be ready to take a leadership role in the further development of International Relations at Royal Holloway. 

In return we offer a highly competitive rewards and benefits package including:

  • Generous annual leave entitlement
  • Training and Development opportunities
  • Pension Scheme with generous employer contribution
  • Various schemes including Cycle to Work, Season Ticket Loans and help with the cost of Eyesight testing.
  • Free parking
  • Competitive Maternity, Adoption and Shared Parental Leave provisions

The post is based in Egham, Surrey where the College is situated in a beautiful, leafy campus near to Windsor Great Park and within commuting distance from London

This is a full time and permanent post.

For an informal discussion about the post, please contact Professor Chris Hanretty, Head of School chris.hanretty@rhul.ac.uk

To view further details of this post and to apply please visit https://jobs.royalholloway.ac.uk. The Human Resources Department can be contacted with queries by email at: recruitment@rhul.ac.uk

Please quote the reference: 0219-052

Closing Date:  Midnight, 29 March 2019 

Interview Date: 9/10 May 2019

The College is committed to equality and diversity, and encourages applications from all sections of the community.


Lecturer in Politics and International Relations (South Asia or West Asia)
School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy, Royal Holloway, University of London
Full Time, Permanent
£42,926 per annum inclusive of London Allowance
Ref: 0219-065

DEADLINE 12 April 2019

tarting Salary is £42,926 per annum inclusive of London Allowance 1*

*This is the expected starting salary for this post however appointment at a higher point may be made for candidates who demonstrate exceptional skills and experience relevant to the role.

The School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy seeks to appoint a Lecturer (assistant professor) specializing in the politics of either South Asia or West Asia. The successful applicant would be expected to start in September 2019.

The School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy is a research-intensive unit that offers teaching which both challenges and enriches students. We provide a full range of undergraduate, postgraduate and doctoral programmes. We carry out research across the disciplines of politics, international relations and philosophy, but we place special emphasis on our research centres: the Centre for International Public Policy (CIPP), the Centre for Islamic and West Asian Studies (CIWAS), the Centre for the Politics of Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East (AAME), the Democracy and Elections Centre, and the New Political Communications Unit.

We welcome applications from emerging scholars in the politics of one of the two regions targeted by this call. Applicants should specify which area they specialize in. Expertise in qualitative methods, and the ability to teach qualitative methods to undergraduate and postgraduate students, is a desirable characteristic for this position, but is not essential.

The successful applicant will be expected to contribute to undergraduate and postgraduate teaching, and to make a contribution to the intellectual life of either the Centre for the Politics of Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East (AAME) or the Centre for Islamic and West Asian Studies. S/he will also be in a position to contribute strongly to the School’s submission to the forthcoming Research Excellence Framework (REF).

In return we offer a highly competitive rewards and benefits package including:

  • Generous annual leave entitlement
  • Training and Development opportunities
  • Pension Scheme with generous employer contribution
  • Various schemes including Cycle to Work, Season Ticket Loans and help with the cost of Eyesight testing.
  • Free parking
  • Competitive Maternity, Adoption and Shared Parental Leave provisions

The post is based in Egham, Surrey where the College is situated in a beautiful, leafy campus near to Windsor Great Park and within commuting distance from London.

This is a full time and permanent post.

For an informal discussion about the post, please contact Professor Chris Hanretty, Head of School chris.hanretty@rhul.ac.uk

To view further details of this post and to apply please visit https://jobs.royalholloway.ac.ukFor queries on the application process the Human Resources Department can be contacted by email at: recruitment@rhul.ac.uk

Please quote the reference: 0219-065

Closing Date:  Midnight, 12 April 2019 

Interview Date: 23 May 2019

The College is committed to equality and diversity, and encourages applications from all sections of the community.

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